Wynter, Haldane in doubles final

first_imgWhen the curtain comes down on the third Jamaica International Badminton Tournament today, local players could challenge for top prizes in at least two doubles finals.The finals will begin at 5 p.m. at the National Indoor Sports Centre.The confident pair of Mikaylia Haldane and Katherine Wynter eased past their counterparts, Taina Dailey and Shezelle McTyson, 21-11 and 21-8 to emerge the first local finalists.”The semi-final wasn’t difficult but tomorrow we will give everything on the court and try our best to ensure that the crowd gets a good match,” Wynter said yesterday.They will play the women’s doubles final against Leanne Choo (Australia) and Rachel Honderich (Canada).Yesterday, the men’s doubles pair of Gareth Henry and Garron Palmer squandered a five-point lead in the final set and went down to the top seeded Slovakian pair of Milan Dratva and Matej Hlinican. The Slovaks won 21-19, 16-21, 28-26.Jamaica’s experienced pair of Bradley Graham and Albert Myles also lost 21-12 and 21-17 to India’s Venkatesh Prasad and Jagadish Yadav. They will play the top-seeded Slovaks in the final.In women’s action, Leanne Choo of Australia and top-ranked Rachel Honderich of Canada booked their place in the final, outclassing Jamaica’s pair of Alana Bailey and Geordine Henry 21-5, 21-6.In women’s singles, top-seed Canadian Rachel Honderich booked her place in the final after an easy 21-2, 21-3 victory over Jamaica’s Taina Daley.last_img read more

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The Importance of CBL Empowering Cape Mountains

first_imgGrand Cape Mountanians, the Tienne people in particular, had good reason to rejoice about the visit last weekend of Central Bank Governor J. Mills Jones.Not only did he pledge to build the county youth’s US$40,000 multipurpose palava hut.  He   also reassured the county’s business people–and poor people throughout the country–that the CBL would continue its loan program, through the empowering of microfinance institutions, in a determined and unrelenting (resolute) bid to lift Liberians out of poverty.The Governor, during his visit to Tienne, made the strongest affirmation yet of his determination to help reform and transform the direction of the Liberian economy, which continues to be dominated by foreigners.  Said he, “We can’t be bystanders in our own economy and expect not to be poor.  If we want to fight and win the war on poverty, we must go to our towns and villages where poverty is.”Our Business Correspondent George Kennedy quoted the Governor as going one step further: he challenged the people, Kennedy said, to “love your country and work hard to develop it.”We don’t know what prompted Governor Jones’ visit to Cape Mount, one of the least developed parts of Liberia.  But Cape Mountains most certainly need a lift–many lifts, in fact.  Visitors to CapeMount often complain that they can find nothing to  buy there, not even a hand of bananas.  Cape Mountainians   to come to Duala to shop for vegetables, etc.  Yet Cape Mount is potentially one of the nation’s greatest tourist attractions, with its clean and beautiful beaches, where foreigners flock every weekend to surf in the Atlantic; and where within a one-mile radius there is a mountain, a river, a lake and an ocean.  Yet Cape Mount is one Liberia’s poorest spots.  They really need help and we are glad the Governor went there.But Cape Mountainans should never forget the Governor’s three chief admonitions to them last week: first, love your country; second, work hard to develop it; and third, pay back your loans, so that others may benefit from the lending program.One other very important attribute Cape Mount possesses is green vegetation.  Even Cape Mount’s outstanding son, Charlie B. Sherman, knew that when he developed an extensive oil palm plantation there in the late 1960s.  That became the biggest agricultural investment the county had ever known.  We don’t know what is happening to that plantation now, since Mr. Sherman has long departed.  But at least he proved that something big could be done in agriculture in the county.So with all that rich land, why is Cape Mount poor, why is she not feeding herself.  This is a question that puzzles many visitors, not just to Cape Mount, but all over Liberia.  We have all this good land that God has given us as our heritage, and yet we are still poor and hungry.  WHAT IS THE PROBLEM?So, Cape Mountainians, listen to the Governor: love your country, work hard and pay back your loans.  One of the manifestations of love is to do everything possible to improve, expand, develop and enrich that whom or which we love.  That is why men buy jewelry and perfumes for their women–to improve their beauty and appeal, to make them happy and more self-confident.  That iswhat all of us Liberians should do for our country–improve, improve, improve Liberia, make her more beautiful, more productive, more self confident.  We can do this by working hard, by being faithful to one another, in our daily interactions and in keeping our financial institutions solvent by paying back our loans.  In this way more lending will be extended and more development will take place.Governor Jones’s personal commitment to Cape Mount and its youth–to build for them a US$40,000 all-purpose palava hut, clearly demonstrates that he is truly interested in Cape Mount.  Can he help show them the way to successful farming, so that the people may start feeding themselves and sending vegetables and fruits to the Duala market to sell?We think this would be an important initiative–empowering Cape Mount’s farmers, for it was Government Jones who this very week told the nation, we have got to produce, if we want the Liberian dollar to compete successfully with the United States dollar.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Finance Minister Kamara and CBL Governor Weeks Must Help End ASAP the Marginalization of…

first_imgFor nearly eight decades Liberian leaders have highly welcomed and commended foreign businesspeople for their investments in Liberia. In extending that welcome and commendation during that entire period, which is nearly a century, our leaders have ignored the fact that each time they have done this, they have never thought of what they were really doing. And what was that? The Liberian leaders were further enriching foreign businesspeople and creating a powerful foreign middleclass, putting them totally in charge of the Liberian economy. Last Thursday’s opening of Liberia’s newest resort, the Boulevard Hotel owned by yet another Lebanese businessman, is no exception. Both President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Vice President Joseph N. Boakai were dutifully in attendance to do the honors, along with an array of other government officials. This new hotel further accentuates the dominance of foreigners in the country’s hotel business industry, as they hold the same sway over most other commercial enterprises in Liberia.Have our leaders, when they are catering, in high profile fashion, to these foreign businesspeople, ever thought of their fellow Liberians? Probably NEVER! One wonders how our Liberian leaders can feel so comfortable, so good, so pleased giving more and more power to foreign businesspeople, leaving their fellow Liberians totally excluded from our own economy!Our fellow Africans—especially Nigerians, Ghanaians—must be wondering what kind of people are these Liberians—surrendering EVERYTHING in their country, including their entire economy, into the hands of foreigners and leaving their own Liberians pitifully poor and powerless. How is it possible, our African compatriots must be wondering, thatLiberian leaders will allow foreign businesspeople to engage in every major business in the country WITHOUT ANY LIBERIAN PARTICIPATION?This newspaper has, since our beginning in 1981, pleaded with successive Liberian administrations to change this dismal (depressing, miserable) status quo because it is a threat to our peace. And the Ellen administration, in power for the past 11 years, has done nothing to address this most dangerous scenario. Did Ellen—or any other Liberian official—learn anything from Counselor Varney Sherman’s 2013 Independence Day Oration when he said that the one thing, more than ethnicity or anything else, that caused the Liberian civil war was poverty?Apparently not. Vice President Boakai commended the United Methodist Church for giving away to foreigners a good portion of its prime property to build a structure and a business in which the church perhaps has absolutely no participation! The new Boulevard Hotel is yet a classic example. That property was set aside for the Methodist Girls Hostel, where many outstanding Liberian women got their foundation.There is only one thing the Daily Observer can do now. That is to lay the case at the feet of two leading Liberian officials whose portfolios are at the center of our economy. These are Finance Minister Boima Kamara and Central Bank Governor Milton Weeks. What can these two officials do? A lot, we think.First, we call on Messrs. Kamara and Weeks to consider very seriously the marginalization of Liberians from the Liberian economy and DO something to address this malaise, which borders on national tragedy.Second, these two officials—Finance Minister Kamara and CBL Executive Governor Weeks—should engineer a crash course program to train Liberian entrepreneurs at all levels—primary, secondary and college institutions. In addition, the two officials should raise the financial resources to help get Liberians into business. We are not talking about “consultancies.” We are talking of opening shops—grocery shops, building material stores, cabinet making, carpentry, plumbing, electrical, electronic, cell phone stores, and tourism businesses, etc. Thirdly, these two officials, Finance Minister Kamara and CBL Executive Governor Weeks, should soberly and seriously consider drafting legislation that will make it mandatory for foreign business enterprises—US$50,000 and above—to secure serious Liberian partners.We hope, pray and trust that these two Liberian officials—Finance Minister Kamara and CBL Executive Governor Weeks—will take seriously these suggestions, in a bold, determined and patriotic attempt to save Liberia from another conflict by empowering our people economically. We know of nothing more important than this that these two most senior economic and financial Liberian managers have to do. Others, who have held these top economic and financial positions, have done their work and departed and left their fellow Liberians in the exact same desperate and pitiful position—marginalized and poor.Finance Minister Kamara and CBL Governor Weeks, please make this all important difference happen, and do so without further delay. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Messengers of Peace

first_img“Peace does not mean an absence of conflicts; differences will always be there. Peace means solving these differences through peaceful means, through dialogue, education, knowledge, and through humane ways.”—Dalai Lama XIV. As humans, we all have a different perception of things. At times, we tend to think of one thing while meaning another. The issue of security and peace is one that has long been around before our forefathers, and will still be around generations after. Peace is like a calm water that enlarges our horizon of knowledge and kills the bitterness harbored deep beneath our ocean floors, seeing equality, equity and justice as a way of life.When I go to the beach to watch the sunset, there is this perfect scenery that has me wishing my life was in accordance with it. The sun, the clouds, the misty blue ocean, they all blend so well creating a pure essence of serenity. As it goes, each object has its part to play so that there aren’t any flaws diminishing its beauty. Imagine if our government and citizens were like that: each one striving for peace in their own way.Personally, I think that one of the reasons why peace and security is not being fully implemented in this country is because the Government and the country do not have that kind of established conversational bond.Somehow, peace may be a dichotomy (it may exist or it may not). The problem of course is that peace derives its meaning and qualities from within a theory or framework. The way in which a Christian, Hindu orBuddhist will see peace will be quite different from the way in which an internationalist, socialist or libertarian sees it. Peace, however, is also seen as concord or harmony and tranquility. It is viewed as peace of mind and serenity, and thought of when war lurks the mind.Security may be defined as the condition of “Not” being threatened, especially physically, psychologically, emotionally or financially.How can there be peace and security in Liberia when there are people being killed on a daily basis with no apparent reasons or what not? I can’t sit still and be oblivious to the fact that 65 percent of the country’s population lives below average and can neither afford to feed themselves, least talk about security.How can we say there’s peace and security when there are little kids constantly in the streets selling and begging? Who’s out there to look out for them? They leave their houses every morning to expose themselves to dangers without even realizing it.How can we say there’s peace and security when there are still zogos, local thieves, and armed robbers swarming the country and terrorizing the citizens for their properties?How can we say there’s peace and security when a breadwinner of a family can’t put food on the table because he’s financially threatened?With these ruminative questions, we are cognizant that peace is not at its apex and security isn’t at the zenith of priority of the government’s plan for the masses. For a nation to be fully free of every vice and vileness, peace and security should remain a paramount concern and a critical national issue. Such matters cannot only be controlled by the Government. We the citizens have to gather and put ideas together to see how we can better our country. We can’t only rely on the Government to do everything for us. They can do the majority, but these little things, we should take the initiative and make them our business. “When somebody helps you to wash your back, wash your front on your own.” Our delicate peace is threatened by the ill-mentality of our youth. They believe that radical approach and violence is the way forward. I’ve come to realize, after extensive research on this topic, that the real damage to a nation is the result of the inability of its people to reconcile, to build bridges of peace over rivers of mayhem. Peace and security is the determination of a nation to experience a society of economic and social freedom, equality, equity and justice, where the lives of the lowest members of our society matters and is treated with the same love and respect.“To replace the paradigm of war with a new paradigm of waging peace, we must be pioneers who can push the boundaries of human understanding. We must be doctors who can cure the virus of violence. We must be soldiers of peace, who can do more than just preach to the choir. We must be artists who will make the world our masterpiece.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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NAREI to improve on potato cultivation

first_img…secures several private proposalsThe National Agricultural Research and Extension Institute (NAREI) has received several partnership proposals from private investors as Guyana continues to see an increase in the need for potatoes to be cultivated on a large-scale basis.This is in light of several successful trials undertaken by the institution over the past year.The research arm of NAREI is in the process of procuring state-of-the-art potato seed storage equipment.According to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Dr Oudho Homenauth, adding such equipment to the list of services already being offered by the institution is necessary, as it positions itself to adequately address the need for the commodity to be grown locally.“Already $5 million has been allocated under our capital works programme for the procurement of the equipment and will be procured shortly…adding potatoes to the list of commodities we (NAREI) have successfully [trialled] is important, but having it done on a large-scale basis is ever more necessary,” Dr Homenauth said.During the trial phase undertaken by the Research Institute, several successful trials were undertaken in conjunction with farmers in Mahaicony, Little Biaboo – Region Five; Laluni and Kairuni on the Linden-Soesdyke Highway, and Kato, Parima, and Santa Fe in the hinterland.However, among the notable challenges which were documented by the Institute were poor germination and the development of fungus as a result of improper storage of seed materials.One of the spin-off effects of Guyana being able to produce potato on a large scale will be a significant reduction in its import bill, which continues to be a challenge for Guyana and the wider Caricom Region. To target this, according to Dr Homenauth, import substitution has to be increased.“From 2011 to 2016, the food import bill has risen from US$176 million to US$261 million, representing a 48 per cent increase over the six-year period. This is an alarming figure and is the premise on which NAREI’s diversification efforts are targeted,” Dr Homenauth stated.In light of Guyana’s quest to expand commercial agriculture, Agriculture Minister Noel Holder has called on investors to take advantage of the opportunities.He added that with the prospect of potatoes being grown on a large-scale basis, opportunities are ripe to engage, network, and grow.last_img read more

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Man remanded for armed robbery

first_imgA 20-year-old man who was recently found guilty of minor offences and sentenced to community service has found himself at court once again, this time to answer to a charge of armed robbery.Shiva Khadier of East Ruimveldt, Georgetown, appeared before Senior Magistrate Leron Daly in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Wednesday.Police stated that on August 11, 2019, at Kitty Seawall, Georgetown, while being armed with a knife, he robbed Jones Sealey of a phone valued at $46,000, a bag valued at $36,000 and $15,000 in cash.Khadier pleaded not guilty to the charge after it was read to him. He was represented by Attorney-at-Law Paul Fung-a-Fat, who asked that his client be released on reasonable bail.However, Police Prosecutor Traceyann Gittens made serious objections to bail being granted to the defendant based on the seriousness of the charge.The Prosecutor told the court that Khadier was found guilty of an offence on July 17, 2019, and was sentenced to community service by the Magistrate after he agreed to repay the victim. This was, however, not done.Upon hearing this, the Magistrate remanded Khadier to prison until September 11.last_img read more

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Mother, daughter commit suicide over financial troubles

first_imgA mother and daughter are now dead after ingesting a poison-laced soda on the Corentyne, Berbice.Dead are Madojri Sawh, 55; and her 17-year-old daughter Diana Sawh, of Grant 1404 Crabwood Creek, Corentyne, Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne).Dead: Diana SawhDead: Madojri SawhReports are Diana Sawh had pawned a number of valuable items from their home for money to assist her boyfriend to pay for a new car. She had raised $500,000 which was given to her boyfriend.It was agreed that the money would have been repaid by September 20 along with the interest it had accumulated to the pawn shop.Guyana Times understands that at about 13:00h last Saturday, Madojri and Diana Sawh were alone at home when they mixed the lethal drink. After consuming the poisonous substance, they remained locked in the house for three hours before Diana called out to a bother who lives next door, indicating that their mother had ingested poison.He arrived and found his mother lying on the floor vomiting and frothing.Several neighbours rushed to the house. One neighbor told this publication that they found Madojri lying on the floor while Diana and her boyfriend were also in the house.According to reports, Diana initially claimed that she had not consumed any of the toxic drink. However, when she accompanied her mother to the hospital, she started to vomit. After being questioned, she admitted that she also drank the poison-laced drink. She was then admitted as a patient.Reports are that Police have since taken the boyfriend, who is married, into custody for questioning.The Police have since urged anyone with feelings of depression and who may possibly be contemplating suicide, to please call the Guyana Inter-agency Suicide Helpline which operates 24 hours, and is organised by the Guyana Police Force, on telephone numbers 223-0001, 223-0009, 223-0818, 600-7896 and 623-4444.last_img read more

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Contract guarantees Exxon control of natural gas

first_img…PPP slams Govt for committing resource without fact-based dataGuyana’s renegotiated contract with ExxonMobil was released only days ago, and analysts and commenters have already expressed concerns over the contract’s content.One such concern is Guyana agreeing to allow ExxonMobil’s affiliates almost unmitigated access to its natural gas while the company is drilling for crude oil. A part of this contract stipulates that Exxon can use gas produced from any oil field within the contract area for its own operations.During an end-of-year press conference hosted by the People’s Progressive Party, Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo observed that besides all the goodies ExxonMobil got, it also received a commitment to use recoverable natural gas for its own operations, with an option to market the excess. According to Jagdeo, there are considerations that should have been resolved before such commitments should have been given.“From the first meeting I had with Exxon, I said, ‘Have you done a feasibility study about gas? What are the incremental benefits to the company and the country to pumping this gas back into the wells? How would it impact recovery of oil versus using the same gas onshore for other value-added activities?’ ” Jagdeo recalled.“Until today, that question has not been answered; and until it is answered through a feasibility study, this Government should have never committed us to a position on gas. They gave away the patrimony of our country. Gas, in the future, may be even bigger than oil, like it is in Trinidad and Tobago. We don’t know about subsequent discoveries.”This diagram shows the process involved in mining natural gasJagdeo noted that notwithstanding the company’s utterances that the deal is a fair one, ExxonMobil came out with several advantages. The former President said that when a comparison is done of what ExxonMobil got to what Guyana received, it would be observed that the renegotiation worked significantly in that company’s favour.“Who guided them (Government) on gas?” Jagdeo questioned. “What feasibility study (on) value added (potential) guided their consideration to lock us into an agreement now on gas in this arrangement? So now that the contract has been released, there are hundreds of new issues we have concerns about, that will harm this country in the future.”Natural GasMined from deep beneath the earth’s surface, natural gas is composed of methane as well as both hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon gases. Not only is it a fossil fuel, it is also non-renewable. While there are some concerns about the applicability of the usage of the gas in Guyana, it is a major driver in neighbouring Trinidad and Tobago’s energy sector.Exxon’s right to use this gas is enshrined in Article 12 of the contract, titled ‘Associated and non-Associated gases’. According to the contract, usage of the gas can include gas injection (a secondary gas production method), lifting and power generation.Article 12.1 (b) states: “Based on the principle of full utilisation of the Associated Gas, and with no impediment to normal production of Crude Oil, a plan of utilisation of the Associated Gas shall be included in the Development Plan of each oil field.”Exxon’s operation in the Stabroek blockIt goes on to state that, “if there is any excess Associated Gas in the oil field after utilisation pursuant to (secondary gas production methods), the contractor shall carry out a feasibility study regarding the utilisation of such excess Associated Gas. Such a feasibility study, if completed before submitting the development plan of an oil field, shall be included in the plan.”The contract also states that if the parties come to an agreement that the gas has no commercial value, then it would be disposed of by the contractor “in the most economic manner.” It notes that this will be done in line with international petroleum industry practice, once it does not interfere with normal crude oil production.The contract sets out that Exxon can choose to market the available natural gas both within and outside of Guyana. Exxon will also have the right to process natural gas for conversion to liquids, chemicals or similar products.It adds that: “In the case of Natural Gas, the contractor and the Minister shall agree on a methodology for valuation of Natural Gas under this Article 13.1 (b) (ii) which represents the fair market value of such Natural Gas at the delivery point, taking into account composition of the Natural Gas.”The Stabroek Block is 6.6 million acres. Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (Exxon’s subsidiary) is the operator and hold a 45 per cent interest in the Stabroek Block. Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd. holds a 30 per cent interest, and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds a 25 per cent interest.last_img read more

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Man Utd can still progress despite PSG defeat, says Herrera

first_img0Shares0000Manchester United caretaker manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer saw his unbeaten run ended by Paris Saint-Germain © AFP / Paul ELLISMANCHESTER, United Kingdom, Feb 13 – Ander Herrera believes Manchester United can still progress in the Champions League despite their chastening home loss to Paris Saint-Germain, saying it will not throw their season off track.After winning 10 out of his first 11 matches in all competitions, caretaker manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer tasted defeat for the first time in the first leg of the round of 16 tie against the French champions on Tuesday. Angel di Maria was the scourge of his former club as he provided assists for Presnel Kimpembe and Kylian Mbappe in a 2-0 loss to PSG that could have been worse but for David de Gea’s performance in goal.Paul Pogba’s sending-off compounded a bad night for United, but midfielder Herrera was not too downhearted after their unbeaten 11-game run came to an end.“I think this result is not going to hurt us because of the way we lost,” the United midfielder said on a night that saw teammates Jesse Lingard and Anthony Martial sustain first-half injuries.“I think the game was tight until the first goal,” he added. “We couldn’t say we were the better team, but they were not better than us either.”But the Spaniard said United could take heart from some good results away from home this season.They won at Juventus in the group stage under Jose Mourinho before securing impressive victories at Tottenham and Arsenal with Solskjaer.“We won away against Tottenham, we won against Arsenal,” he said. “They are teams that are as good as PSG, so we will go there to try and make it difficult for them.“Right now, we have to think about the FA Cup against Chelsea and keep our place in the top four.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Aston Villa transfer target ‘calm’ over future

first_imgAston Villa target Felipe Avenatti says he is not worried if a move to England fails to materialise this summer.The Uruguayan forward currently plays for Serie B side Ternana but has attracted interest from clubs in the Premier League.Villa are understood to be leading the chase for the 22-year-old, while Watford and Leeds are also keen on making a bid.But Avenatti insists he is happy to wait for his chance to play in a top European league.“I am only thinking about training. I am waiting to understand the club’s intentions,” he told Sporterni.it.“I feel good here. I am calm and if I were to stay then I would not be sorry.“If there was a chance to improve by going to play abroad or in a higher league, I would go, but otherwise I’ll stay here without any problems.“I am young and I know that everything depends on me.” 1 Felipe Avenatti last_img read more

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