Sharon And Kelly Osbourne Join Pink Army For Cancer Research UK

first_imgSharon and Kelly Osbourne have joined the Pink Army for Cancer Research UK’s Race For Life.Sharon and Kelly Osbourne Join Pink Army“I’m honoured to be supporting Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life this year,” said Sharon. “As a cancer survivor myself, I know it takes all your strength and the support of your family and friends to overcome this disease. I’m asking every woman – mother, daughter, grandmother, sister and auntie in the UK to step forward and unite to defy cancer. Let’s show cancer that hell hath no fury like a woman in pink.”Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life is a series of women-only events raising money for research into all 200 types of cancer. To find out more, click here.last_img read more

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Led Zeppelin Lead Shares Mementos from Morocco

Rabat- English musician and former Led Zeppelin lead singer Robert Plant shared photo souvenirs of his Moroccan adventures on his official Facebook page.English musician, songwriter, former lead singer of the rock band Led Zeppelin, took to Facebook to share three photos of Moroccan products: a berber carpet, Jaouda milk, and a poster of Berber-amazigh musical group “Oudaden.”“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness,” Plant captioned the images, quoting American writer Mark Twain. Morocco’s diverse, colorful culture continues to spellbind travelers from all walks of life and areas of the world.In recent months, American TV host Ryan Seacrest and his girlfriend model Shayna Taylor enjoyed their trip to Morocco’s mystical Sahara Desert dunes, and the mother of  football star Cristiano Ronaldo, Maria Dolores dos Santos Aveiro, raved about Moroccan couscous during her mini-vacation in the red city of Marrakech.Hollywood also remains enamored with the kingdom’s charm, as illustrated by directors’ penchant for filming in the region: Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Gladiator (2000), The Sheltering Sky (1990), Game of Thrones (2013), Prison Break (2015), Sherlock (2016), and The Nine (2017). read more

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SC rules against removing Tissa

Attanayake was removed from the party after he had decided to extend support to former President Mahinda Rajapaksa at the last Presidential election. (Colombo Gazette) The Supreme Court (SC) has ruled that the expulsion of former UNP General Secretary Tissa Attanayake from the United National Party (UNP) is invalid.In its ruling, the Supreme Court had found that the due process had not been followed when Attanayake’s party membership was cancelled.

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Former Maldives President Nasheed holds talks with Colombo Mayor

“Privileged to meet @Rosy_Senanayake, Mayor of Colombo. Colombo now hosts the second largest population of Maldivians. Discussed long standing historical, commercial and cultural ties between the Maldives and Sri Lanka and the merits of a low carbon development strategy,” Nasheed tweeted.Nasheed lives in exile in the UK and Sri Lanka as he is wanted in the Maldives over a crime he says he did not commit. (Colombo Gazette) Former Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed had talks with Colombo Mayor Rosy Senanayake in Colombo.Nasheed tweeted saying among the matters they discussed was the merits of a low carbon development strategy. read more

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Nearly 7000 Afghans return home as UN refugee agency resumes repatriation

From Iran, where the voluntary repatriation programme continued through the winter, the number of Afghans returning since the start of 2005 was just over 4,000, a number expected to reach 350,000 this year, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said.Overall, more than 3.5 million Afghan refugees have gone home from the two countries since the agency began a voluntary repatriation programme in 2002, following the fall of the Taliban regime there.Last year alone, UNHCR helped in the return of more than three-quarters of a million people. There are between 2 million and 3 million Afghans still in Iran and Pakistan.Under the repatriation programme, each returning Afghan receives a cash grant for transport assistance ranging from $3 to $34 per person, depending on the destination. They are also provided with a cash grant of $12 in place of food and non-food items distributed previously. read more

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Formula 1 boss Bernie Ecclestone to continue to run F1 during bribery

Formula 1 boss Bernie Ecclestone to continue to run F1 during bribery trial but has left board by Geir Moulson, The Associated Press Posted Jan 16, 2014 8:30 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email BERLIN – Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone will keep running the sport despite going on trial for bribery in Germany.Ecclestone did, however, step down Thursday as a member of the board of directors pending the outcome of the trial.Earlier Thursday, the Munich state court decided to send the 83-year-old Ecclestone to trial following his indictment last May. He faces charges of bribery and incitement to breach of trust connected with a $45 million payment to a German banker, Gerhard Gribkowsky.Dates for the trial haven’t yet been set but proceedings are currently expected to start at the end of April, a court statement said. Bribery convictions can result in prison sentences ranging from three months to 10 years in Germany.The board of F1’s holding company met following the announcement, and Ecclestone reassured it that he is “innocent of the charges and intends to vigorously defend the case,” a company statement said.Although he stepped down from the board, the statement said the board “believes that it is in the best interests of both the F1 business and the sport that Mr. Ecclestone should continue to run the business on a day-to-day basis, but subject to increased monitoring and control.”Ecclestone’s German lawyers, Sven Thomas and Norbert Scharf, said in a statement that “the alleged bribery did not happen.”“The accusations in the indictment based on Gribkowsky’s statement are unfounded and do not … add up to a coherent picture,” they added.Jean Todt, the president of governing body FIA, refused to comment on the German court’s decision at an event in Munich on Thursday.Gribkowsky was convicted in 2012 of taking the payment from Ecclestone in connection with the sale of a stake in F1. He was found guilty of corruption, tax evasion and breach of trust, and sentenced to 8 1/2 years in prison.Ecclestone acknowledged during Gribkowsky’s trial that he made the payment but said he was pressured to do so.Gribkowsky was in charge of selling German bank BayernLB’s 47 per cent stake in F1 to investment group CVC Capital Partners in 2006.The indictment alleges that Ecclestone and Gribkowsky agreed on the $45 million payment in May that year and sought to cover up its source and recipient; and that the money was paid between July 2006 and December 2007.Gribkowsky had previously pushed through the payment of a commission of more than $41 million to Ecclestone on the grounds that he “had in his hands the evaluation of the Formula One share and, with that, the sale price,” it adds.In separate legal proceedings in London, German media company Constantin Medien — a former F1 shareholder — is suing Ecclestone and other defendants for up to $144 million, claiming F1 was undervalued by the BayernLB deal.Ecclestone said in November at the High Court in London that he made a payment to avoid being reported by Gribkowsky to authorities over his tax affairs.“I made up my mind he needed to be kept quiet,” Ecclestone said, asserting that he was “shaken down” by Gribkowsky.A ruling is expected early this year in that case.___AP Sports Writer Rob Harris in London contributed to this report. FILE – In this Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 file photo, Red Bull team principal Christian Horner, left, talks with Bernie Ecclestone, president and CEO of Formula One Management, at the Yas Marina racetrack in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. With Ecclestone’s Formula One future in doubt amid bribery allegations, one of the most influential team bosses on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 said the series’ prosperity relies on him remaining in charge. Christian Horner, team principal of reigning constructors’ champion Red Bull, believes Ecclestone is “the only guy” who can ensure F1 maintains its global reach as the premier motorsport series. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File) read more

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Tech stocks trip away from highs but few expect bigger drop

NEW YORK, N.Y. – Technology stocks have taken a stumble over the last week after soaring to heights they last saw just before the dot-com bubble collapsed 17 years ago. Here’s why this time might be different.Technology companies are the main reason the stock market has climbed in recent months. The technology index of the Standard & Poor’s 500 index is up 17 per cent this year, twice as much as the broader S&P 500.Last week they got close to the highs they set all the way back in March 2000. At that time, Mark Zuckerberg was in high school, the iPod didn’t exist, and few people had any idea how a company could make money from internet searches.What’s different now? Unlike then, many of the market’s favourite tech companies are actually making gobs of money.“The sector is delivering on a lot of the promises that investors hoped for during the bubble years,” Jack Ablin, chief investment officer for BMO Private Bank.And yet last week, when the tech index seemed to be just minutes away from breaking a record, the stocks went into a steep slump. Some analysts think the stocks will fall a good deal further.That might bring up bad memories of the tech bubble and its aftermath: the technology index peaked on March 27, 2000, but it nosedived following numerous high-profile company failures, the disastrous AOL-Time Warner merger, and the recession and stock market slump that followed the September 11th terrorist attacks. By late 2002, the tech index had fallen a staggering 80 per cent from its peak.Few investors expect that kind of catastrophe this time. One reason is that technology companies are very profitable now compared to then. After adjusting for inflation, the three largest technology companies of 2000, Microsoft, Cisco Systems and Intel, reported $113 billion in combined revenue that year. Apple alone reported $217 billion in revenue in 2016.“We don’t look at this to be the beginning of the end for the sector,” said Terry Sandven, chief equity strategist for U.S. Bank Wealth Management. “Conditions are good for growth-oriented companies like tech.”Before the 2000 bubble burst, S&P 500 technology companies were trading at about 68 times their earnings. Today they are trading at about 21 times their earnings, a number that is much closer to where S&P 500 companies are usually valued.To put it another way, investors value the technology sector at almost $5 trillion now. After adjustments for inflation, it was worth about $6.4 trillion in March 2000. That’s for a group of companies that were newer, less tested, had far smaller profits and fewer sales, and paid smaller dividends.According to numerous experts, the problem today is not that technology companies are trading on overly rosy growth projections or profits that may never materialize. The stocks have simply risen a lot more than the rest of the market. That can’t continue indefinitely without a break.While the possibilities of technology companies seemed intoxicating in the late 1990s, today it’s easier to argue that the stock gains make sense because the really have changed the world. They’ve remade entertainment, and video game makers Activision Blizzard and Electronic Arts are some of the highest-flying technology companies this year.Design software maker AutoDesk and Salesforce.com have rallied as new technology has reshaped business. With so much critical data now stored in the cloud, cloud computing-focused companies like Microsoft and Adobe Systems have surged. So have numerous chipmakers.That said, some of the gains this year have been staggering. Despite their recent losses, Apple is up 23 per cent this year and Facebook has jumped 27 per cent. Alphabet, Google’s parent company, has climbed 19 per cent. Microsoft has gained 11 per cent. Those are four of the five most valuable companies on the U.S. stock market today. The other member of the top five is Amazon, which isn’t classified as a technology company.After the huge losses of 2000-02, many investors steered clear of technology stocks. It took about six years for the S&P 500 to recover from the losses it took in 2000, and it took the tech index twice that long.“Tech bounced along the bottom for six years” after the bubble burst, Ablin says. “Investors are always fearful of the last crisis, and investors may have just washed their hands of tech.”That, too, is hard to picture today. Sandven, of U.S. Bank, said the stocks should do well as long as the U.S. economy keeps growing and their earnings rise.“We think there’s still more upside,” he said. “We still like the outlook for many of these companies.” by Marley Jay, The Associated Press Posted Jun 16, 2017 9:45 am MDT Last Updated Jun 16, 2017 at 10:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Tech stocks trip away from highs, but few expect bigger drop FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, file photo, a man walks past a Microsoft sign at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting in Bellevue, Wash. Technology companies are on track to reach all-time highs soon, and Microsoft is one of the most valuable companies on the U.S. stock market today. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) read more

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Research chair hits virtual airwaves with podcast

Science Magazine recently produced a podcast interview with Vincenzo De Luca, Canada Research Chair in plant biology.Vincenzo De Luca’s work has appeared many times in many journals.But it was the podcast interview – his very first – on Science magazine’s website that he says has the potential to generate a lot of buzz.“I think one of the things that this type of a podcast in such a journal means is that there is a very wide audience that gets to hear about your published article and your research,” he says.“It may create new opportunities for collaboration with people you normally wouldn’t interact with. I got a whole bunch of requests for re-prints, people who agree with some of the points of view that I put forward in the article, and people who are saying that we hope this is going to help the developing world.”Vincenzo De LucaDe Luca, who is a Canada Research Chair in Plant Biology, co-authored an article published in the June 29 issue of Science, titled “Mining the Biodiversity of Plants: A Revolution in the Making.”In it, he and his colleagues argue that the availability of increasingly inexpensive gene-sequencing equipment allows researchers to expand their search for the production of medicines from plants.Throughout most of human history, all drugs were natural. De Luca says that, until recently, the trend has been for single-ingredient drugs to be produced from metabolites – or small molecules – found in plants.But in recent years, synthetic molecules have replaced natural extracts, particularly in developed countries.Dr. De Luca and his colleagues say that only a small fraction of plant metabolism – immense in its diversity – has been explored for the production of new medicines and other products.“The trend today really involves the identification of biosynthetic pathways and trying to harvest all the genes involved in a relevant pathway, and then transferring the pathway from the plant of origin to a host that may be an industrial bacterial strain, a yeast strain, or maybe even another plant,” he told Science interviewer Edward Hurme during the podcast.Vincent De Luca’s podcast can be found at: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/336/6089/1658/suppl/DC1 read more

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Mens basketball No 18 Wisconsin demolishes Ohio State 8966

OSU junior forward Marc Loving (2) looks on during the Buckeyes’ loss to Michigan State in the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals on March 11,2016 in Indianapolis.Credit: Lantern File PhotoIn the midst of a grueling stretch to begin Big Ten play, Ohio State left the Kohl Center in Madison, Wisconsin, on Thursday night not only with another missed opportunity for a signature win, but also with embarrassment. Senior guard Bronson Koenig and senior forward Nigel Hayes led Wisconsin with 21 and 15 points as the No. 18 Badgers thumped the Buckeyes 89-66, sending OSU back to Columbus with an 0-4 start in the Big Ten, the first time since 1997.This is the third time in six meetings that OSU has lost to Wisconsin by 20 points. It was OSU’s worst defeat of the season.OSU had four players in double figures. Sophomore guard JaQuan Lyle led the Buckeyes with 13 points, followed by redshirt junior guard Kam Williams with 12.OSU had just seven assists to Wisconsin’s 19.Koenig had 15 points at the half, followed by Hayes with 11. OSU was 2 for 10 beyond the arc, compared to the Badgers hitting 6-of-12 shots from 3 in the first half.After halftime, somehow things got worse for coach Thad Matta and the Buckeyes.At the first media timeout, OSU trailed 59-33. The half opened up with two 3s from senior forward Vitto Brown and then two more from Koenig. From there, the lead continued to grow. Wisconsin led by as much as 32 points.Wisconsin made 12 of 22 shots from 3, shooting 55 percent. OSU was 5 of 20 from 3-point territory.For the third time in four games, the Buckeyes found themselves down by double digits in the first half. A pair of 12-2 runs for the Badgers and a couple cold spells in the first half snowballed into a 40-22 lead with 3:03 left in the half.Shooting has been another downward trend for OSU and it reared its head again on Thursday. The Buckeyes shot just 30 percent in the first half, trailing by 18 points after 20 minutes.OSU finished the game with 12 turnovers and was outrebounded 44-31 by Wisconsin.The Buckeyes go for win No. 1 in the Big Ten, once again, versus Michigan State at the Schottenstein Center on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. read more

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National Community Language Schools Conference an overwhelming success

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram More than 550 teachers and instructors from 34 language groups filled the Faculty of Law Auditorium at the University of Sydney on Saturday 8 October, for the 2016 National Community Languages Schools Conference. The event was organised by the NSW Federation of Community Languages Schools and supported by Community Languages Australia (AFESA).“The conference once again highlighted that languages education is an important element in students’ curriculum,” Tassos Douvartzides, chairman of AFESA, emphasised, giving a vote of thanks to all those involved in organising the conference. It also showed how important the community languages school sector is in providing an invaluable resource in Australian education.Mr Douvartzides then spoke about the emotion that languages carry and how “we should cherish this wonderful asset that we have. We should embrace it and hold on to it”.The choir, made up of students in national costume, proudly sang the Australian national anthem and gave a true sense of integration. MC Michael Christodoulou AM then introduced the many invited personalities and community leaders.The president of NSW FCLS, Albert Vella OAM, welcomed all the guests and thanked those present for their commitment and called on schools to continue the vital work that they are doing.Following Mr Vella’s speech, Minister for Ageing, Disability Services and Multiculturalism John Ajaka MLC spoke about his own life experiences of learning languages and again highlighted the volunteering efforts of the community languages schools sector.Minister for Early Childhood Education, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Assistant Minister for Education Leslie Williams MLC also reiterated that the NSW government fully supports community schools via a video message.Meanwhile, State Opposition Shadow Minister for Education Jihad Dib MP offered bipartisan support highlighting the importance of language learning. Professor Leslie Harbon, head of school, international studies at the University of Technology Sydney was the keynote professor. Members of the AFESA Council − Enzo Sirna (WA), Javad Mehr (ACT), Darryl Buchanan (SA), Irene Baldyon (QLD), executive officers and staff, Fahry Abubaker (VIC), Jacqui Dixon (ACT) and Neda Erjae (VIC), together with 11 delegates from WA funded by the OMI, were also in attendance.Following the speakers’ addresses, SBS Director – Audio & Language Content Mandi Wicks presented the SBS National Languages Competition Prize winners awards and thanked the CLA for its cooperation in making the competition happen. Stefan Romaniw OAM, executive director of Community Language Australia, then presented a national perspective. With 100,000 students studying 70 languages, he stated that this conference was another indication of the strength of community commitment to languages education.The afternoon session was filled with more constructive conversation and informative workshops for everyone.last_img read more

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Sorras makes a Uturn

first_imgFor years, Artemis Sorras has been selling himself as a saviour of Greece, a multi-billionaire offering his fortune as collateral to pay off the country’s debts, and urging people to pay for taxes and all other government agencies transactions with IOU notes referring to his alleged bonds of the defunct ‘Bank De l’ Orient’. Now, he is singing a different tune. In a video message addressed to his supporters, the leader of Greece’s strangest grassroots movement urged them to honour their debts themselves, using ‘real money’, instead of his alleged bonds.“If you don’t pay, they will take your home, they will take your life,” he said.“Repaying your debts is the precondition for crushing the beastly state.”This is a far cry from his previous anti-austerity rhetoric which helped shape his organisation, the ultranationalist Convention of Greeks, which expanded rapidly throughout Greece, setting up more offices than any of the country’s major political parties. Despite claiming that he can single-handedly cover the national debt, as well as all his followers’ tax obligations, Sorras asked his followers to pay a registration fee, which led the organisation to accumulate large sums of money.Last March, Sorras and his wife were sentenced to eight years in jail for an older case of embezzlement. Since that time, he has been a fugitive from justice, communicating with his supporters only through video messages. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Les recherches sur le supervirus H5N1 finalement publiées

first_imgLes recherches sur le supervirus H5N1 finalement publiéesMalgré la controverse qu’ils ont suscitée au cours des derniers mois, les travaux portant sur la création en laboratoire d’un virus mutant de la grippe aviaire H5N1 ont finalement été publiés ce mercredi dans la revue Nature.C’est à la fin du mois de novembre 2011 que la polémique est née, lorsque deux groupes de scientifiques l’un américain et l’autre néerlandais ont annoncé avoir créé un supervirus, à partir de mutations du virus H5N1. Un micro-organisme capable de se transmettre entre mammifères et donc potentiellement entre êtres humains alors que le virus de la grippe aviaire en est normalement incapable. Le but de ces recherches était en fait de comprendre si ce virus pouvait muter en une version capable de se transmettre facilement par voie aérienne entre humains et si c’était le cas de pouvoir envisager des moyens d’empêcher une épidémie.Au vu d’une telle capacité, l’annonce des chercheurs avait donc donné naissance à une vive inquiétude dans la mesure où ceux-ci souhaitaient publier les résultats et la méthode utilisée. Le débat portait alors sur la question de les laisser ou non donner les détails de leurs travaux. Des détails qui selon certains, pouvaient potentiellement permettre de recréer le virus en question. Dans un premier temps, le Bureau national américain de la science pour la biosécurité (NSABB) avait donc demandé aux revues Nature et Science de ne pas publier les recherches des deux équipes. Une mesure qui avait été qualifiée de censure par plusieurs scientifiques. Par la suite, le NSABB avait ainsi procédé à de nouvelles évaluations et a finalement décidé en mars dernier d’autoriser la publication des études, estimant que “les données (…) ne semblent pas fournir d’informations qui permettraient une utilisation nuisible (…) au point de mettre en danger la santé publique ni la sécurité nationale”. Hier, la revue Nature a donc été la première à publier les travaux sur ce supervirus, ceux de l’équipe américaine, dirigée par Yoshihiro Kawaoka de l’Université du Wisconsin. Un supervirus testé sur des furets “Les éléments scientifiques essentiels” du manuscrit original “n’ont pas été modifiés” a expliqué Nature qui précise s’être tout de même entouré pour cette publication de plusieurs avis en matière de biosécurité. Dans les pages de la revue, l’équipe de chercheurs explique être partie d’un gène clé du H5N1 codant pour une protéine appelée hémagglutinine et présente à la surface du virus. En ajoutant une mutation à ce fameux gène, ils ont réussi à rendre le H5N1 davantage compatible avec les cellules du système respiratoire humain. Ensuite, ils ont utilisé un virus H1N1 pour créer un virus hybride H5/H1 qu’ils ont testé sur six furets. Des animaux régulièrement utilisés en laboratoire pour leur proximité avec l’homme au niveau du système respiratoire. Au final, les chercheurs ont constaté que les furets infectés ont transmis le virus par voie aérienne à leurs congénères mais aucun d’entre eux n’en est mort. De tels travaux mettent en lumière les mécanismes d’emprunts génétiques qui permettent à un virus de gagner en transmissibilité, ont ainsi expliqué les chercheurs.  À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?D’ailleurs, la revue Nature ne publie pas l’article seul. Elle l’accompagne d’un rapport provenant d’une agence de biosécurité “non-américaine” qui estime que les bénéfices de cette publication dépassent les risques liés à une potentielle utilisation malveillante. Celle-ci argumente : “ne pas publier cette information ralentirait ou même bloquerait le développement de vaccins contre un virus qui a encore la capacité à muter naturellement vers une forme pandémique”. Quant aux travaux de la seconde équipe, celle dirigée par le virologue Ron Fouchier, du centre médical Erasmus de Rotterdam, ils sont encore en cours de “révision” avant publication dans la revue Science.Le 3 mai 2012 à 15:44 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Videos from RAW: Rollins vs. Mahal, Balor slaps Braun Strowman, Memorial Day BBQ

first_img Wrestleview.com Staff RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebook Pinterest Updated RAW Preview: Clash of Champions contract signing, new Firefly Funhouse segment WhatsAppcenter_img WWE RAW videos from the May 28, 2018 episode in Richmond, VA.Sasha Banks wins Gauntlet matchFinn Balor slaps Braun StrowmanThe B-Team’s Memorial Day Tag Team BBQSami Zayn “apologizes” for insulting Bobby LashleyNia Jax / Ronda Rousey confrontationMany other videos from WWE RAW can be viewed on YouTube. WWE Clash of Champions Results – 9/15/19 (Rollins vs. Strowman, Kingston vs. Orton) Google+ Dave Bautista will be a character in new video game, Finn Balor reveals new look last_img read more

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Time to go: North Carolina urges evacuations before flooding

first_imgGREENVILLE, N.C. — Police officers and firefighters in eastern North Carolina cruised low-lying areas and shouted a simple message from bullhorns: Get out before the floodwaters from Hurricane Matthew arrive.Thousands of people were ordered to evacuate, and officials warned that some communities could be cut off by washed out roads or bridge closures. In the city of Greenville, military trucks rumbled through leafy neighborhoods where orange traffic cones and police tape discouraged people from entering. Police were stationed at the edge of the evacuation zone to monitor who came and went.Authorities planned to go door-to-door in some areas, telling people to escape to higher ground. The flooding triggered by heavy rain from Matthew — which killed more than 500 people in Haiti — has left at least 35 dead in the U.S.“There are a lot of people that are hurting, that are living in shelters and are preparing for major, major flooding,” North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory said Wednesday.Authorities closed one bridge across the swollen Tar River in Greenville and warned that several other bridges could close, isolating people. The city’s airport was expected to remain closed for another week due to flooding.last_img read more

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SoccerCity Project Manager responds to the City Attorneys analysis of SDSU West

first_img March 9, 2018 Carlos Amezcua, SoccerCity Project Manager responds to the City Attorney’s analysis of SDSU West Posted: March 9, 2018 Updated: 11:41 AMcenter_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings“SoccerCity” Project Manager, Nick Stone, was in studio Friday responding to the City Attorney’s analysis of the “SDSU West” initiative.Related Story: “SDSU West” and “SoccerCity” plans draw endorsements and comparisons Carlos Amezcua Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: SDSU West, SoccerCity, Stadium Site FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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9 great reads from CNET this week

first_img Tags 0 Post a comment Share your voicecenter_img Tech Industry Hackers and security researchers at the Black Hat and Defcon conferences in Las Vegas this week tackled everything from election security to misinformation campaigns to Android malware that comes preinstalled on your devices.Meanwhile, Samsung grabbed the spotlight by unveiling its Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Plus phones alongside a superthin Galaxy Book S laptop. It was also a big week for weird science news, like tardigrades on the moon, the discovery of a prehistoric dog-size parrot and Jupiter getting slammed by something massive.Amid it all were the following stories you don’t want to miss.What a security researcher learned from monitoring traffic at DefconHe spent thousands on a data-collecting monstrosity to figure out why people considered the security conference’s network dangerous. Mike Spicer Government officials blocked his website, so he went over their headsMehdi Yahyanejad uses an innovative technology to get past internet censorship in Iran and bring information to poor and isolated communities in Mexico. roadtrip-mehdi11 Marta Franco/CNET Galaxy Note 10 Plus 5G is the latest proof that 5G isn’t for you — yetAT&T may be vindicated in withholding its 5G service from consumers so far.003-samsung-galaxy-note-10-plus-5g Sarah Tew/CNET My e-bike brush with deathA crowded Manhattan street, an unprotected bike lane and the high-tech helmet that saved my life.27-joey-bike-helmet-accident Sarah Tew/CNET Those robocall blocker apps are hanging up on your privacyIf you downloaded an app to block spam calls, its privacy policy is likely giving up your personal information.Women use mobile application software on smartphone phone Getty Images You have Samsung’s original Galaxy Note to thank for your big phone screenSamsung’s original Galaxy Note is why the iPhone XS Max and other big-screen phones exist.samsung-galaxy-note-8688 James Martin/CNET Woodstock at 50: Five weird facts about the world’s most famous music festivalBelieve it or not, the media had to explain words like “grooving” to the less hip. And even in 1969, Woodstock’s future was unsure.Hippy Bus Getty Images President Trump wants social media to catch shooters before they strike. It’s going to be hardArtificial intelligence isn’t there yet.President Trump Delivers Remarks On The Weekend's  Mass Shootings Getty Images Getting the best Wi-Fi speeds from your ISP? Here’s the fine printThrottling? Hidden fees? Data caps? Here’s a rundown on how all of the major ISPs in the US manage their networks.tp-link-router-8 Chris Monlast_img read more

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Culinary whiz kids earn laurels

first_imgHyderabad: The finale of Forum Junior Chef Champ Season 3 Marathon was held at the Forum Mall, Kukkatpally on Sunday. As many as 414 children in the age groups of 7-11 and 11-15, from across the twin cities, participated in the prelims held on Saturday, where they were given 45 minutes to cook novel dishes, all the while keeping them healthy for children to dig into. Also Read – Secunderabad: Major General N Srinivas Rao makes farewell visit to AOC Advertise With Us Out of the prelims round held on Saturday, 15 kids from each age group were selected for the finale. They had to present two dishes. For first dish, they were asked to cook choose between pasta and pizza, and for the second dish, they had to make a dessert of their choice. Each child got 90 minutes in the grand finale on Sunday. It was visual feast for the culinarily curious gathering to watch the children, armed with ladles and spoons in checked aprons and hats, bring out their creative best to win the coveted prizes. Also Read – Kolkata artists giving final touches to 24 ft clay Ganesh idol Advertise With Us Delete Edit PreviousNextWinners from first category (age 7-11) was presented MTB bicycle, whereas winners from the second category won Sony PS4. Sanjay Thumma popularly known as Vah-Chef and founder of the cooking website, vahrehvah.com, was the head jury at the contest. Lalitha Aashrita emerged the winner in the age group of 7-11 and Anushka bagged the first prize in 11-15 years category. Advertise With Us Forum Junior Chef Champ Season 3 is the signature event organised by the renowned Forum group. This is one of the biggest Junior Chef Championships held nationwide. This is one of the biggest Junior Chef Championships held nationwide. The event was held across 8 Forum malls in Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Chennai, Mangaluru, Mysuru, Udaipur. A beaming Lalita Aashrita said, “I promised my brother before coming here that I would win him a bicycle. I am very happy and proud that I won and so are my parents. I want to thank my school as well for informing me about the contest. Without them I wouldn’t have known it. Everyone in my school will be happy that I won.” Anushka said excitedly: “It was a very tough competition, and everyone was doing good. I am glad that I won. My parents are very happy. I love cooking at home and usually cook for my family. My parents encouraged me to take part in this and they were the ones who believed in me and I am happy that I made my family proud.”last_img read more

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Full Show Vetting Sources In Breaking News And Plans To Eliminate Student

first_img On Monday’s Houston Matters: A Texas Tribune investigation found a source many news organizations quoted related to the Santa Fe school shooting last year doesn’t exist. David Briscoe was quoted in articles by Time, CNN and the Wall Street Journal, but the Santa Fe School District has no record of anyone by that name at the school that day — or ever. We examine what more reporters can do to vet their sources — especially in high-pressure, breaking stories.Also this hour: Several Democratic presidential candidates have plans to eliminate or mitigate student debt or offer free tuition at public universities. We examine how realistic those proposals are.Then, News 88.7 immigration reporter Elizabeth Trovall tells us about her experiences visiting communities along the Texas-Mexico border in a reporting assignment for the public radio show 1A.And Jeff Balke updates us on Houston sports.  We offer a daily podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and other podcasting apps. This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listencenter_img X 00:00 /00:00last_img read more

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National Aquarium Immersion Tours Offer Guests Sneak Peek At Newest Exhibit Living

first_imgEver wanted to touch a jellyfish or see a stingray up close? Guests of the National Aquarium will have those opportunities and more in the organization’s newest exhibit, Living Seashore, set to open this May. In advance of the opening, a select number of guests will have the chance to see the exhibit come to life before it opens to the public through two of the Aquarium’s Immersion Tours.Beginning Feb. 28, participants of the National Aquarium’s daily Behind-the-Scenes Tour and weekend Insider’s Tour will become the first guests to step inside the Living Seashore exhibit before the construction walls come down and the exhibit opens.“Seeing an exhibit as it is coming together is a perspective that very few get to experience. We’re thrilled that guests will now be able to see just how much is happening behind the scenes,” said Steve Skobel, Immersion Program Manager for the National Aquarium.The daily Behind-the-Scenes Tour is an all-access experience during which guests learn how the Aquarium team cares for more than 17,000 animals and their habitats. From life-support systems and water quality to amazing animal care and research, guests explore the building in a whole new way and understand what it truly takes to run an aquarium. And now, with the addition of Living Seashore, guests can discover what it takes to design and build a realistic habitat for the Aquarium’s newest residents and an immersive, interactive experience for future guests. The 45-minute tour is available to guests ages eight and up and is available daily for $15 per person. Aquarium admission must be purchased separately to experience this tour.The Insider’s Tour is available to guests ages eight and up on Saturday and Sunday mornings. The tour, priced at $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers, is approximately two and a half hours long. Small groups will explore the exhibits with an Aquarium expert who will share fascinating stories about the Aquarium’s animals and the habitats they call home, lead guests to exclusive staff-only areas, take guests up-close with one of the animal residents and much more. The Insider’s Tour ticket includes a full day of exploration at the Aquarium.Opening this May, Living Seashore is an interactive exhibit featuring two touchpools and a variety of hands-on exploratory experiences. Living Seashore will take guests beyond the boardwalk to the crashing waves, sandy beaches and shifting dunes of the everchanging Mid-Atlantic seashore, where they will encounter a variety of marine life.For more information on Living Seashore, visit aqua.org/ livingseashore.For additional information on Immersion Tours and to purchase tickets, visit aqua.org/visit/immersion-tours.last_img read more

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Algae could generate hydrogen for fuel cells

first_imgAn image of Chlamydomonas used in the study. Credit: Surzycki, et al. © 2007 PNAS. Now, a team of biologists including Raymond Surzycki and Jean-David Rochaix from the University of Geneva, and Laurent Cournac and Gilles Peltier, both from the Atomic Energy Commission, the National Center for Scientific Research, and the Mediterranean University, have demonstrated a new method for hydrogen production by algae. In a recent issue of PNAS, the team presented a method using copper to block oxygen generation in the cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that could lead to a consistent cycle of hydrogen production.In order to induce hydrogen production in the algae, cells must be placed in an environment without oxygen but with access to light. To completely deplete the algae’s oxygen supply, the researchers turned off part of a chloroplast gene required for oxygen evolution by adding copper to the cells in an enclosed chamber. Specifically, the addition of copper turned off the Cyc6 promoter, which drives the Nac2 gene, which is required for photosystem II (PSII) synthesis. PSII generates oxygen.Within about three hours, nearly all the oxygen was consumed by respiration, and the algae reached an anaerobic state. Without oxygen, the algae began to synthesize hydrogenase and then produce hydrogen.“Hydrogenase is an enzyme that produces hydrogen by combining electrons derived from the photosynthetic electron transport chain with protons,” Rochaix explained to PhysOrg.com. “It is only produced under anaerobic conditions because the photosynthetically produced oxygen is highly toxic to the hydrogenases.”One of the most significant differences between this method and earlier methods is using copper addition rather than sulfur depletion to repress photosynthetic activity. In past experiments, when the cells’ sulfur was depleted, the cells stopped growing and died after a few days. However, when adding copper, the biologists observed that the cells remained healthy. The rate of hydrogen production in the plants with copper was slightly lower than that of sulfur-depleted plants, but comparable.The scientists also observed that, in healthy cells, the Cyc6 promoter doesn’t stay repressed for long due to “anaerobiosis”—the ability of the cells to survive (and repair) with lack of oxygen. Subsequently, PSII activity is restored, and the cell returns to producing oxygen. What happens when you explode a chemical bond? Citation: Algae could generate hydrogen for fuel cells (2007, November 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-11-algae-hydrogen-fuel-cells.html Explore furthercenter_img For several decades, scientists have known that certain species of algae can produce hydrogen in anaerobic conditions. More recently, researchers have been trying to take advantage of this ability to produce hydrogen that could be used by fuel cells to generate electricity—without expensive processes like electrolysis required for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. However, as the scientists point out, this apparent limitation may turn out to be an advantage, since the procedure could be repeated over and over again. Through the alternate expression and repression of the Nac2 gene, the researchers have opened up the possibility of establishing a cycling hydrogen producing system. “One unique feature of the Cyc6 promoter which we use for driving photosystem II synthesis is that this promoter is turned off in the presence of copper but partially switched on under anaerobic conditions,” Rochaix said. “As explained in our article, it is thus in principle possible to establish a cycling hydrogen production system without changing the growth medium in a single vessel. This is the major advantage.”The development of the Cyc6-Nac2 system for controlling chloroplast gene expression can be applied to any chloroplast gene, as the researchers further demonstrated in the study. The method could therefore help scientists investigate the roles of different plant genes in live cells and genetically modify plants, including modifying Chlamydomonas to increase hydrogen productivity.“We are still at a very early stage,” Rochaix said. “We need more basic research for understanding the complex regulation of photosynthesis, respiration and starch metabolism for establishing a more efficient system.” He explained that one option might be to establish a cycling system in which photosynthesis generates reducing power with starch, which can subsequently be used to feed the hydrogenase once anaerobiosis has been achieved. “Another strategy is to modify the hydrogenase by genetic engineering to make it more tolerant toward oxygen,” he said. “One might screen microorganisms in nature for the presence of oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases. The genes of these enzymes could then be introduced into algal cells and tested for hydrogen production under less stringent anaerobic conditions.” He added that several laboratories are making efforts along these lines.“The final challenge will be to produce bioreactors in which large amounts of algae can be grown with efficient hydrogen production,” he said. “It is too early to say whether we will be successful, but it is clearly important to undertake research on this problem given its great potential impact for clean energy production.”More information: Surzycki, Raymond, Cournac, Laurent, Peltier, Gilles, and Rochaix, Jean-David. “Potential for hydrogen production with inducible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, October 30, 2007, vol. 104, no. 44, 17548-17553.Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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