Traffic Advisory Halifax Regional Municipality

first_imgHALIFAX REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY: Highway 102 The northbound lanes of Highway 102, between the junction of Highway 118 at Miller Lake and Exit 6 (Halifax Stanfield International Airport) have lane closures for seal coating. Closure times are:Monday to Thursday, sunrise – 3 p.m.Friday, sunrise – noonSaturday and Sunday, sunrise – 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. to sunset. Work is expected to be completed by Monday, Aug. 31. -30-last_img

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Suicide of First Nations youth shows kids in care must be heard

first_imgCALGARY – Alberta’s child and youth advocate says the suicide of a 15-year-old indigenous boy reinforces how crucial it is that the voices of children in provincial care be heard.A report by Del Graff published Wednesday recounts the short and troubled life of the boy, called Levi for privacy reasons.The report details a household marred by addiction, mental-health issues and violence. There were intermittent stays in foster homes and with other relatives, where Levi seemed to do relatively well.Levi’s first encounter with child intervention services was when he was just two months old.“Levi’s life was unpredictable and lacked the stability necessary for his healthy growth and development because of his exposure to family violence, parental addictions and homelessness,” Graff writes in the report.Levi is described as kind and quiet.When he was 11, there were concerns he had nowhere to live. When he was 12, he was discovered living in a tent in a yard because of his mother’s drinking.Little is known about the final two to three years of Levi’s life.“It is unclear where he was living or how his basic needs were met,” Graff writes. “At times, community members gave him food and clothing.”The report outlines how shortly after he turned 15, Levi was taken to hospital for stomach pains after he’d been drinking for six days. He continued to drink after being released and went back to the hospital the next morning, but left without seeing a doctor.He said he was depressed about a friend who had killed himself and talked about his own suicide by alcohol poisoning.Four months later, Levi took his own life.The children’s advocate notes there were numerous occasions over the years when Levi made it clear he did not want to be around his mother when she was drinking, but there was no indication his feelings were acknowledged.“This investigative review emphasizes the importance of making sure that children’s voices are heard and their perspectives considered in decisions made about them,” Graff writes.“Children become invisible when they are not included in assessment and planning processes.”He says he has urged a more child-centric approach to decision-making in three past reviews, so there’s nothing new to add in Levi’s case.“Minimal progress has been made on these recommendations.”The report also stresses the need for the government to develop ways to identify children early on who may be at risk of homelessness.Children’s Services Minister Danielle Larivee says Levi’s story shows change is needed.“We need to do better. When a young person reaches out to us to ask for our help, our instinct is to do whatever we can to support them,” she said in a statement.“Albertans expect that their child intervention system would do the same. However, it is very clear that, in this case, Children’s Services did not do everything possible to support this young man to grow up safe and healthy.”The case of a four-year-old girl named Serenity, who died in 2014 under suspicious circumstances while in kinship care, has become emblematic of problems with Alberta’s approach to child intervention.Leaked reports to the media late last year revealed that before she died, Serenity was taken to hospital emaciated and hypothermic with signs of physical and sexual abuse. She died from severe brain trauma.No one has been charged.The case led to a political shakeup. Earlier this year, Notley carved out a separate Ministry of Children’s Services and assigned Larivee to run it.She also struck an all-party panel to examine ways to better protect children in care.last_img read more

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ColdFX class action lawsuit over misleading ads thrown out

first_imgAdvertisement But in a written decision released Wednesday, Justice Janice Dillon of the B.C. Supreme Court says Harrison failed to prove there is an identifiable group of people with the same complaint about the company’s advertising who bought Cold-FX.She also ruled that Harrison isn’t the best plaintiff to represent the interests of others in the class-action because he hasn’t established he has a complaint against the defendants.Dillon noted that the plaintiff only said he purchased Cold-FX in 2011, didn’t say what specific product he purchased and was “recruited by his lawyer.”“Harrison had expressed in public that he thought that Cold-FX was a ‘colossal scam’ based on a television documentary; however, there is no evidence that he had any idea about representations in the labelling or marketing of the product, or that he was even concerned or felt harmed by them,” she says in the ruling.Lawyer Alan D’Silva, who represents Valeant and Afexa, said the decision is exceptional because the judge decided not only was there no class of people with a valid complaint, but there wasn’t a single person who had a complaint.“It’s finally disposed of and dismissed and it can no longer be a distraction for the company because it never had any merit in the first place,” he said in an interview.But Harrison’s lawyer, John Green, said there will be an appeal.“He took the product,” he said after the decision was released. “It didn’t work, certainly that’s his allegation and I’ve never seen any research that would support that it would work.”The court only decided on the class-action issue and Harrison’s allegations against Valeant have yet to be tested in court.Green is also the lawyer in a similar lawsuit in Saskatchewan that covers the rest of the country. A separate case was started in B.C. because the province had different class-action legislation.The drug company is defending itself against allegations it misled customers about the natural-health product’s short-term effectiveness in reducing cold and flu symptoms, which its advertising claimed in the past.D’Silva said extensive evidence was filed about the product’s success along with consumer research showing that more than 90 per cent of users are pleased with the product.“A lot of time and money has been wasted on this already. It needs to come to an end,” D’Silva said. Facebook A judge has rejected a Vancouver Island man’s bid to launch a class-action lawsuit against the makers of the cold and flu remedy Cold-FX.Don Harrison launched a claim in 2012 against Valeant Pharmaceuticals and its subsidiary, Afexa Life Sciences, over advertising that said Cold-FX offered immediate relief of cold and flu symptoms if taken over a three-day period at the first sign of illness.He wanted other people who purchased the product to be able to join the lawsuit. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

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Blackstone makes Gemini splash

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt was a big night for Aboriginal television at the Gemini Awards this week in Toronto.The APTN series Blackstone won two awards at the gala event.Michelle Thrush won for best actress in a drama series.The ecstatic Thrush dedicated her award to the late Gordon Tootoosis who was also her mentor.Thrush says Blackstone creates a medium of healing for our people.Blackstone also won for best achievement in main title design. The show, currently in production, is about a chief trying to make a difference in her community.The show’s second season airs in 2012.last_img read more

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UNESCO head condemns Mexican journalists killing

25 January 2010The head of the United Nations agency tasked with defending press freedom today condemned the killing of a Mexican radio reporter who focused on crime, calling on authorities to do their utmost to bring those behind the attack to justice. José Luis Romero, who worked for Radio Linea Directa in the western state of Sinaloa, was abducted at gunpoint from a restaurant in the city of Los Mochis on 30 December.Reportedly shot in the head and shoulder with his hands and legs broken, his body was found more than two weeks later in a black bag near the city.The journalist, “like all too many reporters in Mexico, has paid with his life for our right to be kept informed,” said Irina Bokova, Director-General of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).He is the second Mexican journalist to be killed this year, while at least 11 media professionals were murdered in the country last year, most of whom had been covering drug trafficking and crime, according to the International Press Institute, a non-governmental organization.“The use of force to muzzle reporters constitutes an unacceptable attack on the basic human right of freedom of expression and on society’s right to enjoy press freedom, a cornerstone of democracy and rule of law,” Ms. Bokova underscored. read more

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Ban deplores twin suicide bomb attack on camp for displaced persons in

“[Mr. Ban] deplores the death of scores of internally displaced persons (IDP) and injuries to many others,” said a statement issued by his spokesperson, referring to the February twin suicide bombings on the IDP camp, which, according to media reports, left more than 70 people dead and at least that many injured.“The Secretary-General extends his deepest sympathy and condolences to the Government and people of Nigeria and to the bereaved families. He also wishes a speedy recovery to those injured,” said the statement.The UN chief in his statement also called for an end to all acts of terrorism and sectarian violence in Nigeria and reaffirmed the support of the United Nations to the Government in its fight against the scourge.“He reiterates his call for a comprehensive approach to preventing and countering the scourge of terrorism, and addressing its root causes in compliance with international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law,” the statement concluded. read more

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Dell lance une nouvelle gamme de toutenun

first_imgDell lance une nouvelle gamme de “tout-en-un”Alors que Samsung vient de présenter sa nouvelle gamme de PC tout-en-un, Dell dévoile à son tour ses modèles, avec un Inspiron One 23 qui monte en gamme. La firme abandonne la plateforme AMD pour lui préférer l’architecture Sandy Bridge d’Intel.Dell vient vient de lancer (lien non disponible) une nouvelle gamme d’ordinateurs tout-en-un aux États-Unis. Le fabricant texan propose une version améliorée de l’Inspiron One 23, qui fait monter l’ordinateur en puissance.La première évolution notable est l’abandon de la plateforme AMD pour l’architecture Sandy Bridge de deuxième génération d’Intel. Décliné en trois modèles, le nouvel Inspiron offre un écran 23 pouces Full HD tactile, rétroéclairé par LED.Le premier prix est équipé d’un processeur Core i5-2400Sn d’une puce graphique Intel HD Graphics 2000, de 6 Go de mémoire vive DDR3, et offre 1 To de stockage.Le second modèle est quant à lui doté d’une puce graphique dédiée Nvidia GeForce GT 525M. Il bénéficie de 8 Go de mémoire vive, de 2 To d’espace de stockage et d’un lecteur de Blu-ray. Enfin, le PC tout-en-un le plus cher se différencie par un processeur Core i7-2600S, mais en gardant la même capacité de stockage et de mémoire vive que le modèle précédent.À lire aussiLe premier programme informatique a été créé en 1842 par une femme ! Tous sont en outre dotés du Wi-Fi N, du Bluetooth 3.0, de l’Ethernet Gigabit, de quatre ports USB 2.0 et des sorties audio analogiques et vidéo HDMI et VGA.Déjà disponibles aux États-Unis, les trois nouveaux Inspiron One 23 sont vendus de 950 dollars pour le premier prix (712 euros), à 1.400 dollars (1.050 euros) pour le modèle le plus haut de gamme. Les précédents modèles étant distribués sur le marché européen, cette nouvelle gamme devrait en toute logique être prochainement commercialisée sur le Vieux Continent.Le 7 octobre 2011 à 10:31 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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CREDC touts its role in job creation

first_imgClark County’s chief economic development agency reported Wednesday that companies it works with invested about $120 million in land purchases, and building and equipment improvements this year, creating or maintaining 941 jobs in the region.“I believe we are doing a good job of creating jobs in the community,” Bart Phillips, president of the Columbia River Economic Development Council, said to more than 130 attendees of the nonprofit organization’s annual meeting at the Vancouver Convention Center.However, Phillips said, the tens of millions in land, building and equipment investments, while beneficial in many ways — including schools and local governments that benefit from the rise in value of property-tax rolls and the increase in sales-tax revenues — don’t necessarily add up to large job creation.In fact, the county’s level of economic development activity remains relatively low compared with previous years, Phillips said. What’s more, the county must find ways to help an increasing number of people who will lose their unemployment benefits and who will face home foreclosures as the county struggles with a jobless rate of 13 percent as of October. The county is going to “have some real issues with unemployment” for some time to come, Phillips said. Commerical real estate, computer chipsWednesday’s event also featured two speakers who addressed the prospects of two different industries that are relevant to Clark County: the market for commercial real estate, which includes office towers and industrial parks, and the market for computer chips, which are installed in everything from smart phones to high-definition camcorders.last_img read more

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Woman rescued while on cruise ship takes photo with paramedics

first_imgMIAMI BEACH, FLA. (WSVN) – A woman is thankful to be alive after an emergency off the coast of Miami Beach.Miami Fire Rescue saved the woman, Thursday night, aboard a cruise ship when her medical condition required her to evacuate the ship. The rescue happened about four miles off Miami Beach.Paramedics transferred the woman to a fireboat and then to a nearby hospital, but not before taking a picture with her.The woman called it an unforgettable boat ride.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Firefighters rescue dog from house fire

first_imgFORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (WSVN) – Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue saved a dog from a burning home, Wednesday.The dog was trapped in her crate when the fire sparked in the kitchen.The blaze started just after noon, at the house on Northwest Seventh Place and 19th Terrace.Nobody was home except the dog.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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Sacramento Media Acquires Sierra Heritage

first_img The terms of the acquisition were not disclosed. The 35-year-old title, which covers the Sierra Foothills region, will be rebranded next year under the new name of Sierra Living. Sacramento Media has acquired Sierra Heritage magazine from El Toyon, Ltd. Joe Chiodo, publisher of Sacramento Magazine, was named publisher of Sierra Heritage, and Krista Minard, editor of Sacramento Magazine, was named editorial director, effective immediately. Sacramento Media publishes Sacramento Magazine, Sacramento Home, Sacramento Magazine’s Our Wedding, Serrano Magazine, Sacramento Visitors’ Guide, and Sacramento’s New Era, out of Sacramento. The new publisher will continue the magazine’s bi-monthly frequency and distribution throughout the Sierra Foothills, though archives of the magazine are no longer available online. Dyess, who worked as vice president of Sunset magazine for 14 years, joined Sierra Heritage in 2006. He co-owned the company with Sue Quatela, CFO. The magazine was founded in 1981 by Janice Forbes, who served as publisher until her death in 2013. “The opportunity to publish this time-honored magazine perfectly complements our other brands in the area,” John Balardo, president of Sacramento Media, said in a press-release. “We look forward to applying all of the powerful resources of Sacramento Media to continue to provide a high level of service to our readers and advertisers.” Following the acquisition, the magazine left its long-held Auburn, California, office for Sacramento, though only one Sierra Heritage employee, former co-owner and CEO Rick Dyess, will stay on as a consultant.last_img read more

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Ice racing is the most fun you can have on four wheels

first_imgIf you want to get into racing, there are plenty of hurdles you’ll need to overcome along the way. For traditional sorts of racing that take place on racing circuits or rally stages, those hurdles are huge. Cost is the one that stops most people before they get anywhere near the pits, but equally problematic are challenges like time and simple availability. And let’s not forget risk: No form of motorsport is entirely safe and many entry-level varieties require checking your sensibilities at the starting grid. What if I told you there was a form of motorsport that is (relatively) cheap, easy to get into, doesn’t require hours of maintenance after every race and is quite safe — at least, as far as these things go. Ice racing is that sport, and not only does it tick all those boxes, it is, I believe, the most fun you can have on four wheels. There’s only one big caveat: you have to live somewhere cold, and believe it or not, that’s an increasing challenge. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value What you’ll need Most ice racing clubs provide some means of getting out there with your road car, and AMEC is no different, featuring classes for both street-legal (SL) two-wheel drive and all-wheel drive machines. You will, at a minimum, need proper snow tires to enter, though SL cars can optionally step up to the street-legal-studded (SLS) class. Here the Nokian Hakkapeliitta is the spec tire. Cheap snow tires can be had for $50 a corner, though you can spend more than four times that on premium rubber. For a set of Hakka 9s, Nokian’s latest studded tire, you’re probably looking at $150 and up per tire. But, the great news is that if you treat your tires right and don’t run unusually high or low tire pressures, a set will last a full season.ice racing studsEnlarge ImageNokian Hakkapeliitta 9 tires are the spec option for the studded, street-legal glass. Tim Stevens/Roadshow Yes, a full season on one set of relatively affordable tires. How many other series allow that? Nokian supplied me a set of Hakkapeliitta 9 tires for the purpose of putting this article together. Though they have very short, DOT-legal studs that barely protrude beyond the surface of the tire, they offer a massive improvement of grip over an unstudded tire on clean ice. And, after six race weekends in both 2018 and 2019, about 18 race sessions plus various practices, my set hasn’t lost a single stud. Eventually, though, they will begin to wear out and start throwing studs. Unstudded tires, meanwhile, get increasingly hard and lose grip as the corners of their tread blocks round off. There’s still good news, though, too: Last season’s race tires just become this season’s street winter tires. AMEC does offer plenty of other, racier classes if you want to go faster, all of which run on tires with more aggressive race studs. I won’t iterate the various requirements for the myriad classes (you can read the guidelines here), but suffice to say your car will require a roll bar and some extra lighting at an absolute minimum. Stick with the SL or SLS classes, however, and all you’ll need will be a Snell-rated helmet, a set of numbers and a few other things to ensure you keep your pit area clean. That’s it. Personally, I race in a 2004 Subaru WRX STI that I drive to and from every event. 39 Photos Tags 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Comments Sideways on the ice is the only way to be What it is Quantifying amateur ice racing is difficult because there’s no single, dominant organizing body establishing what such an event should look like. So, I’ll loosely define “ice racing” as any event where you drive on ice at speeds greater than your car’s designers had in mind. Since most cars are designed to be operated primarily on dry asphalt, you really don’t need much velocity before you’re well and truly operating outside the performance envelope. (And yes, I see all you motorcycle ice racing clubs out there and I send you my respect, but for this article I’m just focusing on the four-wheeled antics.) Beyond that incredibly vague definition, ice racing is highly dependent on your local club. Many organizations run relatively low-speed time trials, slippery autocrosses that test your own patience as much as your car’s performance. Other clubs run wheel-to-wheel races on short tracks populated by welded-up jalopies that look like extras witnessed in the last Mad Max movie. I’ve even seen footage of icy big rig racing and then there’s whatever this fantastically excessive event is. However, the kind of racing I primarily want to talk about here is that which I participate in with one of the best-organized racing bodies in the US. Since 1954, the Adirondack Motor Enthusiast Club, or AMEC, has held events on the various lakes that punctuate the tiny towns in and around the Adirondack Park in New York. Many of these villages basically shut down to all but snowmobilers for the months between December and March, but on Sunday afternoons, if the conditions are right, you might just see a gaggle of misfit machines gridding up to race. AMEC events run on simple circuits plowed out by a graciously dedicated and immensely appreciated plow crew. When I started doing this a decade ago, tracks were often in excess of 1.5 miles, but these days ice conditions often necessitate tracks less than a mile in length. These tracks are run clockwise and feature turns going both left and right, though those corners tend to be of the sweeping variety. AMEC racers, you see, like to go fast, and that they do wheel-to-wheel, often with dozens of cars on track at the same time. It can get busy out there. A weekend’s entry fees? Just $70, which gets you a 20-minute practice session followed by three 15 or 20 minute races. That, dear readers, is as good a value as you’re likely to find in the wide world of motorsports.Not too often you’ll see a pit lane with boats in the background… Randy Cresci/Clutchfoto Hold on, you drive on lakes? Yes, plus various other waterways, too. And yes, it’s safe. AMEC has been doing this for 60-odd years now and the various officers have the process of measuring ice thickness down to a science. Ice must be 12 inches thick throughout, a volume providing plenty enough buoyancy to support the hundreds of cars that show up for a big event, plus the big tow rigs that bring many of them there. Regardless of all that, you’ll probably still get a funny feeling the first time you drive down a boat ramp in your car. I did too. You’ll get an even funnier feeling the first time one of those big tow rigs cruises by your grid spot and the whole surface of the lake shifts beneath your feet. It’s always easy to pick out the newbies at the drivers’ meeting: They’re the ones jumping every time the ice shifts.Yes, it is safe, but that’s not to say there aren’t risks. This is wheel-to-wheel racing and crashes do occur. Serious injuries are rare, but they do happen, as do wrecked cars. As in all forms of motorsport, don’t race what you can’t afford to lose. It’s always easy to pick out the newbies at the drivers’ meeting: They’re the ones jumping every time the ice shifts.   center_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Subaru 2 More From Roadshow Car Culture The technique The technique of ice racing is effectively a form of drifting, but you won’t get any points for style here. This is very much a race, and the act of driving your car sideways at speeds approaching 100 miles per hour, inches away from the door of another car, is thrilling to say the least. It’s also pretty damned challenging. Traditional circuit racing is all about finding the line and then making the best use of your car’s abilities along that line. In ice racing, things get a lot more complicated because the line itself is often quite different from what you’d use on an asphalt racing circuit. Additionally, that line has an annoying tendency to shift through the course of a race. Much like trying to find the pocket in a dirt oval event, the ideal line through a given corner on the ice will change over the course of a race heat. In the SL races, the rubber-heavy tires polish out the ice, creating very smooth, low-grip patches at the apex and in the braking zones. Conversely, the faster cars on race studs dig up the ice and make it more rough. So, like racing in the rain, you often have to find the grip first and let the line come next, but even doing that will require a driving technique that’s rather… extreme. Ice RacingEnlarge ImageYou’ll often see some real classics out there on the ice. Randy Cresci/Clutchfoto All sideways all the time Bench racers often use the term “lock-to-lock” to describe a situation where they had to frantically counter-steer to correct for a tail-happy car. In general, that’s hyperbole. In ice racing, however, you will regularly explore the maximal extent of your car’s steering, often while swearing and watching a snowbank grow rapidly larger through your side windows. That’s just part of the fun. And it is fun, but the goal on ice isn’t to go as far sideways as possible. You actually want to keep your car pointed as close to straight as possible to ensure you’re carrying the most speed. Going sideways with your foot on the gas can be fast, especially in a heavy AWD car with a laggy turbo, but finesse and control are far more important. Finesse here primarily means understanding and managing the balance of your car. Simply getting a feel for your car’s behavior on ice can take a full season of racing or more. Getting to the point where you feel fully in control can take much longer. But, to truly find success, you will have to deploy every trick in the racer’s book. Pendulum turns? You’ll need these if your car has the slightest tendency toward understeering. Rev-matching and toe-heeling? Smooth is fast, and if you have a manual car you’ll be busy. You’ll be kicking the clutch and left-foot-braking to manage over- or understeer, trail-braking to keep some weight (and grip) on the nose plus a dozen other techniques I’m forgetting about. If you haven’t gotten the idea by now, ice racing can be incredibly challenging. It relies on feel as much as technique, and that feel can take a very long time to develop. More than one eager newbie has spent their first race stuck in the snowbank outside the very first turn. But, master this, and I firmly believe you can handle just about anything. Where you can do it My club, AMEC, runs in Upstate NY, most frequently on Lake Algonquin in Wells, NY, but at a number of other lakes in the region. Here’s a short and by no means complete list of other car-minded ice racing organizations in North America: Adirondack Motor Enthusiast ClubCentral New York Ice Racing AssociationInternational Ice Racing Association (Minnesota)Lakes Region Ice Racing Club (New Hampshire)Michigan Ice Racing AssociationOur Gang Ice Racing (Colorado)Sports Car Club of VermontWest Coast Ice Racing (Maine)(Did I miss your club? Email me and I’ll be glad to add it.) Ice RacingClose racing is to be expected at all times. Randy Cresci/Clutchfoto But for how much longer? I hate to end on a downer, but I will, because I’m increasingly afraid that ice racing is a dying sport. I’ve never spoken to a group of motorsports fans more concerned about climate change than those shuffling around in the pits on a lake in March. As an 11-year veteran, I’m still a relative newcomer compared to many folks that make AMEC run, yet even in that time I’ve seen a noticeable change in things. Finding good ice seems to be getting more difficult, with tracks often getting shorter to avoid bad patches or events canceled late due to unpredictable weather. If that weren’t bad enough, insurance costs are skyrocketing and, while the businesses in these small towns are happy to see us come by in the dead of winter, many locals would prefer we took our show elsewhere. Each year the outlook seems a little more grim, and so each year I find myself pondering something else to keep me busy on winter weekends. But then I get out there and spend the day sideways on the lake, STI screaming for mercy and tires doing their damndest to find grip, and I find myself totally addicted again. I’m convinced this is the greatest form of amateur racing on planet Earth, so if you have the means and the geographic proximity, get yourself out there and enjoy it while it lasts. Share your voicelast_img read more

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How 5G figures into the TrumpChina trade war

first_imgWhat’s the government done to ensure 5G Huawei gear won’t be used in US networks?All of this has led to the US cracking down on the company. Last month, Trump signed an executive order essentially banning the company from all US networks. On the same day, the Trump administration also blacklisted Huawei, adding it to the US “entity list,” which prevents it from buying US products and services. (Yes, that means Google mobile services too.) Huawei has filed a motion in US court to have US legislation that bars federal agencies from buying its products ruled unconstitutional. It’s also sent a memo to the FCC in which it objects to being banned on the grounds of national security threats.Still, hardware and software vendors have been fleeing Huawei: Amazon Japan reportedly no longer offers Huawei devices for sale, and in May Google locked Huawei out of its Android updates, though the Commerce Department granted it a three-month general license to update existing devices. And now it looks like Huawei could use Android again.What about networks in other countries?While the four major US wireless carriers have kept Huawei gear out of their existing 4G networks and aren’t planning to use it for 5G, it’s all over Europe and other parts of the world. Networks in the UK and Germany have Huawei gear powering their 4G networks and are starting to upgrade to the company’s 5G gear. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been traveling around the globe urging other nations to stop using Huawei gear, and he’s been threatening to not collaborate or share intelligence information with countries that use its equipment. This is a huge ask by the US government, which will cost these countries billions of dollars and delay their own rollouts of 5G service. So it’s no surprise these countries aren’t jumping in line. The UK and Germany each say they’re still evaluating the risks posed by Huawei gear in their networks.  How does all of this relate to Trump’s trade war with Huawei?In general, US officials don’t like the way China does business, or its ambitions to become an economic superpower by beefing up its technological prowess. They claim the country’s policies are unfair and encourage intellectual property theft and corporate espionage while forcing control of foreign companies operating in China. President Trump Speaks On 5G Deployment In The U.S.In April, President Trump touted plans to invest $20 billion in 5G and other technologies to improve rural broadband access.  Tom Brenner/Getty Images To combat this, Trump has waged a trade war, ratcheting up tariffs to 25% on some imported Chinese goods as a way to get Beijing to the negotiating table. As part of this strategy, the Trump administration has also used the national security concerns specific to Huawei and its ban as bargaining chips in the negotiations. It sounds like Trump is sending mixed messages. Is that a problem?Indeed, less than a month after banning Huawei from US networks and restricting US companies from supplying the company with key components, Trump then eased those restrictions, allowing US companies to get licenses to supply the company in cases where there’s no threat to national security. Experts say that throwing Huawei and the national security concerns into the trade negotiations muddies the waters. “It weakens your ability to take a clear and consistent stand in defense of national security,” said Scott Kennedy, deputy director of the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He said it shows China and US allies that the security concerns may not really be a big deal.Adam Segal, director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, agrees that Trump’s approach is misguided. “When the president suggests that he could make a deal with China on Huawei as part of a larger agreement on trade, it sends the wrong message to our allies,” he said. “They aren’t going to commit to removing Huawei from their networks and risk being left out of whatever deal he strikes with China.”What does the Huawei ban in the US mean for 5G? It’s difficult to know specifically, since the policy seems to change almost daily. But Hans Vestberg, CEO of Verizon, the largest wireless carrier in the US, told a CNBC reporter last week that he’s not worried about the ongoing US-China trade war affecting its 5G network. “We are executing our strategy with our Western European vendors,” he said. “It seems that you can do that without Huawei.”He stressed that Verizon has no reliance on Chinese gear. “We don’t use any Huawei equipment, and we have no impact from the Chinese trade war,” he explained. “So for us, this is a nonevent.”Likewise, none of the big four US carriers uses Huawei equipment, so the impact is minimal. What about the smaller players?Small rural carriers will be affected because they used Huawei and ZTE gear in their 4G networks since it was more affordable. And this could be a problem for getting 5G into rural communities. FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks and others are pushing to have this Chinese gear ripped out and replaced to ensure the security of US wireless infrastructure. “Having Huawei in our current network infrastructure means that we are exposed to the same type of risks that we’re talking about for our next-generation 5G networks,” he said in an interview with CNET. “One thing I want to make clear is that we can’t just focus solely on making sure our networks are secure going forward, but that we make certain we don’t have any national security risks in our current networks, when we know there is lots of Huawei gear already out there.”Lawmakers are already proposing bipartisan legislation to help fund the rip-and-replace effort. In their bill, Sen. Roger Wicker, a Republican from Mississippi, and Sen. Mark Warner, a Democrat from Virginia, have suggested putting $700 million toward dealing with the issue.But representatives for rural carriers say the cost is likely higher. Last month Carri Bennet, general counsel for the Rural Wireless Association, took part in a workshop about the issue hosted by Starks at the FCC. She said the price tag on replacing Huawei or ZTE technology will likely range from $800 million to $1 billion. She also explained that swapping out this gear will take considerable time and effort and can’t be “done overnight or with ease.” She said members of her association estimate it could take between four and 10 years to complete. Chris Reno, director of accounting for Union Telephone Company, said that “Every dollar and man-hour spent on the project represents resources that don’t expand coverage, don’t build towers and don’t improve broadband in rural areas or help our communities.”Are there other effects the Huawei ban and trade war may have on 5G? One other potential consequence is that it may slow the development of the final 5G standard and could potentially split the market in terms of the technology. The full standard for 5G isn’t yet complete, and the process to finish it will likely take years. Huawei and other companies developing 5G technology are very involved in the process. But a report from Reuters last month indicates that some US chipmakers are restricting their employees from working closely on the standard with Chinese counterparts at group meetings. Though the Commerce Department hasn’t restricted collaboration on the standard, any reluctance to work together, whether formal or informal, could slow the development of the technology. Ultimately, it could also lead to a split in the standard that could mean the US would be using different 5G technology than China and other countries. This has happened before, when the US embraced the cellular CDMA standard in 2G and 3G, while the Chinese government worked to fund the rival TD-SCDMA standard. Meanwhile, Europe went with its own GSM standard. One thing is clear: The situation is still evolving and changing. And it’s hard to predict what’ll happen next. The story originally published at 5 a.m. PT.Update, 7:30 a.m. PT: To include additional background.  Is 5G coming to a city near you? 2:50 13 Photos China has rebutted these allegations in a 67-page document entitled, “The Facts and China’s Position on China-US Trade Friction,” which it published in September last year.  The Chinese embassy forwarded CNET the document when asked for comment about how the US has categorized its efforts to transform its economy. In that document, China calls the US’ accusations that it’s stealing advanced technologies an “insult to China’s efforts to push for scientific and technological advances.” “The Chinese nation is known for diligence, intelligence, and ingenuity,” the document says. “The progress in science and technology China has made comes from years of implementing a strategy of invigorating the country through science, technology and education and the strategy of innovation-driven development, and from the hard work of the Chinese people, especially scientific workers.”To help you better understand why the US is so hell-bent on keeping Huawei out of 5G networks and what it means for the future of the wireless world, we’ve put together this FAQ. What’s 5G again?It’s the next (fifth) generation of cellular technology, which promises download speeds 10 to 100 times faster than those of current 4G networks. It’s being rolled out across the country now. One of the key benefits is something called low latency, which is the response time between when you click on a link or start streaming a video on your phone, which sends the request up to the network, and when the network responds, delivering you the website or playing your video.That responsiveness is critical for things like driving autonomous vehicles that need to make split-second decisions to avoid crashes or using an augmented reality application in the grocery store to pick out a safe product for your child with a severe food allergy. Why is it important for the US to ‘win’ the race to 5G?The short answer is that whichever country leads in the development and deployment of 5G technology will see more economic growth and will have more power.”The leader of 5G stands to gain hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue over the next decade, with widespread job creation across the wireless technology sector,” the Defense Innovation Board, a group of American business leaders and academics, said in a report for the US Department of Defense earlier this spring. Tech heavyweights such as former Alphabet Chairman Eric Schmidt, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and Walter Isaacson, the author and a former chief executive of the Aspen Institute, participate on the board.Mobile World Congress Shanghai 2019 - PreviewsHuawei is one of the leading companies developing 5G equipment.  Getty Images For the US, this means maintaining the technological and economic lead it developed with its 4G wireless technology. But for China, it’s an opportunity to surpass the US and the West to become the economic and geopolitical superpower it has long wanted to be.That said, not everyone agrees that it’s a race. In a blog post last week, former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said:”‘Winning 5G’ is not so much a ‘race’ as it is a process. Characterizing 5G as a contest demeans its great technological progress and the policy challenges that progress presents. 5G should be more than a political talking point; the new network represents the need for a meaningful policy strategy.”How’s the US doing? It depends whom you ask and on what day. Trump is all over the map. One day, he says the US is lagging in the 5G race and needs to catch up to China. The next day, he’s saying the US is winning and will dominate 6G. Even wireless and technology experts can’t seem to agree. Wireless industry trade association the CTIA claims the US is “tied” with China. And it’s advocating for policy objectives to keep pushing the US toward dominance. But the Defense Innovation Board offered a more dismal outlook. In its report issued in April it offered a scathing assessment:”The country that owns 5G will own many of these innovations and set the standards for the rest of the world,” it said. “That country is currently not likely to be the United States.”Ouch.Why is the Defense Innovation Board’s assessment so bad?There are several reasons. For one, the authoritarian regime in China has invested massive amounts of money in companies such as Huawei to develop 5G technology, to great success. Chinese companies hold the majority of the world’s 5G patents. The Chinese government also controls China’s wireless service market and is pushing its three major providers, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom, to combine efforts to develop a standalone 5G network that’ll commercially launch in 2020. In this photo illustration a 5G logo seen displayed on aUS officials say the US must win the race for 5G. Getty Images Meanwhile, there are no major US companies building and developing 5G telecom equipment. Thanks to decades of market consolidation, US companies once dominant in providing telecom gear have been sold to foreign companies. And now the market for 5G gear is led by Chinese-based Huawei as well as Nokia and Ericsson, both based in Northern Europe.The US’ free market approach also makes getting a nationwide 5G network built quickly a challenge, as the four major US wireless companies struggle to balance intense competition with network investment and innovation for 5G. But the biggest issue for the US, according to the report, is that the country hasn’t been quick enough in making available the wireless spectrum that’s essential to deploying the service. And the spectrum the US is making available is the wrong kind. Specifically, the US has been allocating a lot of so-called millimeter wave or mmWave  spectrum, which can transmit huge amounts of data very fast. But signals can travel only over short distances, and interference like trees or even bad weather can disrupt service. The problem with using this spectrum is that it’s hugely expensive to build a network this way. And it’ll be impossible to blanket the nation with the service, because it’ll be too costly.Ideally, the US needs midband and low-band spectrum in the mix. The only problem is that the prime spectrum that could be used for this service is already being used by the military. And getting government agencies to share spectrum with commercial entities is no easy task. The report says the US needs to work more quickly to force military and government stakeholders to share this spectrum with the wireless industry. How does Huawei fit into all this? Huawei is one of the biggest makers of 5G equipment, and its technology is also considered to be the most advanced. And it’s the second largest smartphone maker behind Samsung, having surpassed Apple last year. But it’s not your average tech giant, according to US national security experts. The company, founded in 1987 by a former officer of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, still has close ties to the Chinese government, according to six US intelligence chiefs, including the directors of the CIA, the FBI and the National Security Agency, who testified before Congress in 2018 that the company could conduct “undetected espionage” if its gear was used in US networks. Huawei has repeatedly denied these claims. For years, national security experts in the US have been concerned about Huawei, fearing that Beijing could direct the company to put backdoors in its software to spy on the US and its allies. They also fear that Huawei’s gear could be used in a massive cyberattack that could disrupt communications networks in the event of a conflict between the US and China.  The company has also been accused by the US Justice Department, in indictments that included 23 counts of alleged theft of intellectual property, obstruction of justice and fraud related to allegations it bypassed US sanctions against Iran. Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Canada at the request of the US, and awaits extradition. 5G Huawei Donald Trump 0 Tagscenter_img Share your voice Mobile Politics US President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping before a bilateral meeting during the G20 Summit last month.  Getty Images What do 5G and the Chinese telecom-gear maker Huawei have to do with the escalating trade war between the US and China? In a word: everything. 5G, the next generation of wireless, will not only allow you to download an entire season of Stranger Things in minutes, but also serve as the foundation to support the next generation of infrastructure, including billions of internet-connected devices powering smart cities, cool new VR and AR applications and driverless cars.Naturally, President Donald Trump wants the US to lead in 5G. What’s at stake is more than just bragging rights; the outcome of the 5G race is likely to determine whether the US will continue to maintain its technological edge and shape geopolitics for the next couple of decades or if it’ll cede that control to China, which sees technological dominance as a way to become a world superpower. In the middle of it all is Huawei. A year ago, most Americans had likely never heard of the company. Now it’s in the news nearly every day as a centerpiece of the US-China trade battle. Huawei is a dominant supplier in the 5G market. But national security experts say the company’s close ties to the Chinese government could be dangerous for the US and its allies, because its gear could be used for espionage or to shut down critical communications networks during some future conflict. Huawei is also emblematic of a bigger issue the US is grappling with. As China tries to transition from a country known for making toys and cheap plastic tchotchkes to one that leads in advanced technologies like artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, robotics and 5G, it’s adhering to a state-led industrial policy that US intelligence officials say relies on intellectual property theft, forced technology transfers, cyberespionage and discriminatory treatment of foreign investment, according to the Council on Foreign Relations.It’s these concerns over unfair trade practices that have led to Trump’s tariffs on the import of Chinese goods and the blocking of Huawei and other Chinese tech companies from access to US markets. null Now playing: Watch this: Samsung, LG, Motorola: How soon can we expect 5G phones?last_img read more

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Alaska News Nightly Tuesday August 4 2015

first_imgHappy 225th Birthday, Coast Guard!Kayla Desroches, KMXT – KodiakToday is the 225th birthday of the United States Coast Guard. The new commanding officer of Air Station Kodiak, Captain Mark Morin says he started in his current position in June, but his time as a pilot in the Coast Guard first brought him to Kodiak in the mid-1990s.Bird Death Reports Are Up In Homer, Food Sources Possibly To BlameQuinton Chandler, KBBI – HomerThe Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge is receiving multiple reports indicating a significant increase in dead and dying birds found on beaches in the Homer area over the last two weeks.Atchak Arraigned For Murder Charge In Death of Roxanne SmartBen Matheson, KYUK – BethelTwenty-year-old Samuel Atchak was arraigned in Bethel Superior Court on Tuesday morning. He’s charged in the murder of Roxanne Smart last August.Murkowski’s Planned Parenthood Vote Has the Left Seething, the Right UnmovedLiz Ruskin, APRN – Washington, D.C.Yesterday the U.S. Senate considered legislation that would have defunded Planned Parenthood. Both Alaska senators voted to advance the bill, but it failed on a procedural motion, so the Senate has gone on to other issues.  Meanwhile, though, reaction to Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s yes vote, in favor of moving the anti- Planned Parenthood bill, is still ricocheting around Alaska and social media.Legislative Special Session Cost Nearly $1MAssociated PressThe two special sessions held as lawmakers struggled to agree on a state budget cost more than $886,000.Artist Casts Bodies in Bethel to Highlight Mental HealthDaysha Eaton, KYUK – BethelAn artist is creating life-sized sculptures of Alaskans to tell the story of those who struggle with mental health. Sarah Davies travelled to one of the state’s most vulnerable regions, recently for a project called, ‘100 Stone’. She’s attempting to highlight the toll that depression takes and what people can do to help those in need. Suspected Capitol Flag Thieves Caught on TapeJeremy Hsieh, KTOO – JuneauThree men were caught on tape who are suspected of breaking into the construction site at the state Capitol building, scaling the scaffolding and stealing flags off the roof.Construction to start at Brucejack Mine in British ColumbiaEd Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska – JuneauConstruction of another British Columbia mine near a river that flows into Alaska could begin within a month. But it’s a small operation sparking fewer concerns on this side of the border than some other projects.A Year After Mine Disaster, Wrangellites Protest BC MinesKatarina Sostaric, KSTK – WrangellA protest in Wrangell on Sunday marked the one-year anniversary of a mining disaster in Canada and sought to bring attention to mines being developed across the border from Southeast Alaska. About 100 people marched through Wrangell behind a banner that read “Keep the Stikine Clean.”Cantwell Hydro Projects Draw SkepticismDan Bross, KUAC – FairbanksSmall hydro-electric projects proposed for the Cantwell area are receiving a mixed response. Stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.Download Audiolast_img read more

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Fishermen seek removal of encroachments in Gara

first_imgSrikakulam: Hundreds of fishermen from Kalingapatnam, Gara and Matsyalesam villages demanded for removal of encroachments along Bay of Bengal coast in Gara mandal.They took out a huge rally in Srikakulam city on Monday for which YSRCP MLA D Prasada Rao expressed his solidarity. The fishermen said that in recent past the beach at Kalingapatnam eroded due to high tidal waves following encroachments by unauthorised persons along the coastal belt in the name of tourism development. Also Read – 10 injured as school bus falls off bridge in Nellore district Advertise With Us They raised slogans against destruction in the name of tourism development along the coast and demanded for removal of encroachments along the coastal area for the safety of larger interests of people. The fishermen found fault with the previous government for giving permissions to private companies and persons for tourism development. Later they submitted a memorandum to Collector J Nivas by presenting their views at ‘Spandana’ at Collectorate.last_img read more

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Judge asks White House to restore CNN reporters access

first_imgCNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta arrives at US District Court in Washington, DC, on 16 November 2018, as Judge Timothy Kelly is expected to rule on a lawsuit filed by CNN against the White House after it revoked Acosta’s press credentials. CNN’s suit, which the White House dismissed as “grandstanding,” drew support from major US news organizations, including Fox News, the Rupert Murdoch-owned television network known for its friendly coverage of Trump and other conservatives. Photo: AFPA federal judge Friday ordered the White House to reinstate the press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta, whose pass was revoked after a heated exchange with president Donald Trump.Judge Timothy Kelly issued a temporary restraining order that requires the White House to restore Acosta’s access until a full hearing is held, according to the network.CNN and other media groups, including Trump favourite Fox News, backed the lawsuit, which claimed that revoking Acosta’s pass violated constitutional guarantees of a free press.Kelly, a Trump appointee to the bench, said that his ruling was based on “due process” for the journalist, and that he would hold additional proceedings on the constitutional issues at stake, including the First Amendment free press guarantee.“I want to be very clear that I have not determined that the First Amendment was violated,” he said in the Washington courtroom, adding that he based his decision on a 1977 ruling that required the White House to offer reasons for denial of press credentials and an opportunity to respond.CNN said in a statement: “We are gratified with this result and we look forward to a full resolution in the coming days. Our sincere thanks to all who have supported not just CNN, but a free, strong and independent American press.”Acosta said outside the courthouse: “I want to thank all of my colleagues in the press who supported us this week. And I want to thank the judge for the decision he made today. And let’s go back to work.”CNN’s lawyer argued in court Wednesday that the White House violated Acosta’s First Amendment right to free speech in revoking his credentials.The US Justice Department’s lawyer, James Burnham, countered that Acosta had “disrupted” last week’s news conference. Burnham insisted “there is no First Amendment right to access the White House.”Acosta, CNN’s chief White House correspondent, angered Trump when he persisted in questioning the president at a November 7 news conference, ignoring demands he yield the microphone.From the podium, Trump called Acosta—a frequent target of his ire—a “rude, terrible person.”Media organizations backing CNN included the Associated Press, Bloomberg, First Look Media Works, Gannett, the National Press Club Journalism Institute, NBC News, The New York Times, Politico, Press Freedom Defense Fund, EW Scripps Company, USA Today and The Washington Post.“Whether the news of the day concerns national security, the economy or the environment, reporters covering the White House must remain free to ask questions,” the media groups said in a joint statement ahead of Wednesday’s hearing.‘Broad discretion’ argument -The White House said in its legal filing that it has “broad discretion” to restrict media access to the president, disputing the argument that its actions violate the constitution.“The president and White House possess the same broad discretion to regulate access to the White House for journalists (and other members of the public) that they possess to select which journalists receive interviews, or which journalists they acknowledge at press conferences,” said the brief.The filing by US Justice Department lawyers argued that “the president could choose never to hold another press briefing again and cancel all press passes, without implicating due process protections.”CNN—part of the WarnerMedia division of AT&T—filed suit on Tuesday.Trump’s administration initially said Acosta was banned for inappropriately touching a White House female intern as he struggled to hold on to a microphone.The White House cited a video that analysts said had been sped up, giving the appearance that Acosta struck the intern’s arm.last_img read more

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Universal transistor serves as a basis to perform any logic function

first_img The researchers who designed the transistor, led by Walter M. Weber at Namlab gGmbH in Dresden, Germany, have published the new concept in a recent issue of Nano Letters.“Synthetic nanowires are used to realize the proof-of-principle,” Weber told PhysOrg.com. “However, the concept is fully transferable to state-of-the-art CMOS silicon technology and can make use of self-aligned processes.”The new transistor’s core consists of a single nanowire made of a metal-semiconductor-metal structure, which is embedded in a silicon dioxide shell. Electrons or holes flow from the source at one end of the nanowire through two gates to the drain at the other end of the nanowire. The two gates control the flow of electrons or holes in different ways. One gate selects the transistor type by choosing to use either electrons or holes, while the other gate controls the electrons or holes by tuning the nanowire’s conductance.Using a gate to select p- or n-type configuration is quite different from conventional transistors. In conventional transistors, p- or n-type operation results from doping that occurs during the fabrication process, and cannot be changed once the transistor is made. In contrast, the reconfigurable transistor doesn’t use any doping. Instead, an external voltage applied to one gate can reconfigure the transistor type even during operation. The voltage causes the Schottky junction near the gate to block either electrons or holes from flowing through the device. So if electrons are blocked, holes can flow and the transistor is p-type. By applying a slightly different voltage, the reconfiguration can be switched again, without interfering with the flow.The scientists explain that the key to making this reconfiguration work is the ability to tune the electronic transport across each of the two junctions (one per gate) separately. Their simulations showed that the current is dominated by tunneling, suggesting that the nanowire geometry plays an important role in the ability for independent junction control. Because the reconfigurable transistor can perform the logic functions of both p- and n-type FETs, a single transistor could replace both a p- and n-type FET in a circuit, which would significantly reduce the size of the circuit without reducing functionality. Even at this early stage, the reconfigurable transistor shows very good electrical characteristics, including a record on/off ratio and reduced leakage current compared to conventional nanowire FETs. In the future, the researchers plan to further improve the transistor’s performance.“We are varying the material combinations to further boost device performance,” Weber said. “Further on, first circuits implementing these devices are being built. … The biggest challenge will be to incorporate the extra gate signals in the cell layout allowing flexible interconnection to the other transistors.” The reconfigurable transistor’s core consists of a nanowire structure embedded in a silicon dioxide shell. Electrons or holes flow from the source at one end of the nanowire through two gates to the drain at the other end of the nanowire. One gate is used to program the p- or n-polarity, whereas the other gate tunes the conductance through the nanowire. Image credit: ©Namlab gGmbH (PhysOrg.com) — Most of today’s electronics devices contain two different types of field-effect transistors (FETs): n-type (which use electrons as the charge carrier) and p-type (which use holes). Generally, a transistor can only be one type or the other, but not both. Now in a new study, researchers have designed a transistor that can reconfigure itself as either n-type or p-type when programmed by an electric signal. A set of these “universal transistors” can, in principle, perform any Boolean logic operation, meaning circuits could perform the same number of logic functions with fewer transistors. This advantage could lead to more compact hardware and novel circuit designs. Explore further Journal information: Nano Letters More information: André Heinzig, et al. “Reconfigurable Silicon Nanowire Transistors.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl203094hcenter_img Panasonic Develops New Gallium Nitride Power Transistor with Normally-off Operation Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Universal transistor serves as a basis to perform any logic function (2011, December 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-12-universal-transistor-basis-logic-function.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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